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Stateless Versus Stateful Sage 300c Web UIs

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Introduction

When two computers communicate they use a well-defined communications protocol. In Browser to Server communications these are often broadly categorized as either stateless or stateful. A stateless communications protocol doesn’t require that anything be remembered between calls. In web applications this is desirable for a number of reasons:

  • often calls are load balanced across multiple servers (perhaps even in different locations).
  • storing state in memory can be expensive and will limit how many users can be accessing a web server at once.

On the other hand, maintaining server state has some advantages:

  • less information needs to be transferred between the client and server since the server knows what has gone before.
  • having things handy in memory can make operations faster and more context aware.

Often in the real world these components are combined or stacked on each other, for instance the TCP protocol is stateful and then the HTTP stateless protocol is layered on top of TCP.

The Sage 300c Web UIs use both stateless and stateful technology. This article will talk about when we use each, how to program either case and what are the advantages and disadvantages of each method. Like many things in programming the lines between these two things can become quite blurred.

Since we do have stateful UIs, this does require that if you scale out to multiple web servers then the load balancer must use sticky sessions as we explained in this blog posting. Basically guarantee that all the requests from a given client go to the same web server in case they are running a stateful UI.

Stateless Sage 300 Web UIs

Most of the Sage 300c setup UIs, processing UIs and report UIs are all stateless. This means IIS could be reset between requests and things would still work. It would just be quite slow since it would need to re-open a Sage 300 session and re-open the Views to process the next request. To avoid this we keep a cache of open sessions along with their open Views. This way when a stateless request comes in we match up a session for the right company, user and with the right Views from the session pool and use that to handle the request. If a session in the pool hasn’t been used for a while we will release it and if too many sessions are in use, we will release the oldest if we need another one. This way practically speaking you usually open a session for your first stateless request and then keep using it from the cache of the duration of your work.

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A Typical Stateless UI

Every Sage 300c business logic entity (View) will have a stateless repository defined for it. This is because only the document entry UI needs stateful operation, everything else like finders, export and other UIs will want to use the stateless version. You get all the default behavior for your stateless repository by having your specific repository inherit from one of the stateless base repositories in Sage.CA.SBS.ERP.Sage300.Common.BusinessRepository.Base like FlatRepository, ProcessingRepository or InquiryRepository.

Generally stateless operation fits very well with ASP.Net MVC since this is the natural way that it works. There is a lot of infrastructure to pass the data model back and forth between the client and server in a stateless manner. Add to that our use of knockout data binding and this makes most basic CRUD operations all handled by the framework.

This doesn’t mean that a stateless UI can’t dynamically interact with the user. By default, you have the CRUD operation off the basic navigation and save/delete buttons. But you can certainly add your own custom AJAX calls to dynamically update areas of your form. We provide support in the framework to update things like descriptions of external keys, but in fact you have a lot of power to make your UI very interactive and polished.

Stateful Sage 300 Web UIs

Most of the main Accounting document entry UIs are stateful. This includes UIs like Order Entry, Purchase Orders, G/L Journal Entry and A/R Invoice Entry. These UIs have a lot of sophistication in building up the Accounting document and the size of these documents can be quite large. Sending this entire document back and forth between the browser and the server as a JSON object is quite impractical. When one of these UIs is started, a session and set of Views are assigned to it for the duration that it runs. As changes are made to the UIs they are sent to the server to make the attendant changes to the server model.

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A Typical Stateful UI

To create a stateful business repository, just inherit from one of the stateful base repositories in Sage.CA.SBS.ERP.Sage300.Common.BusinessRepository.Base.Statefull like BatchHeaderDetailRepository or SequencedHeaderDetailRepository.

When you exchange information between the server and browser rather than send the entire document back and forth, you tend to send one component back and forth like one order detail line or the order header. This then reduces the amount of data transmitted, but more importantly greatly reduces the size of the JSON object that JavaScript needs to process. If the transferred document gets too large then JavaScript processing speed can become a real bottleneck.

You don’t need to send something to the server every time every field changes, only the fields that cause some business logic to execute. So you don’t need to do anything say when the user changes a description field. When a field changes that causes business logic on the server to execute then you need to send that to the server and get back all the fields that changed as a result. We tend to mostly do this using the default ASP.Net MVC mechanisms along with the knockout data binding. But only doing it for the component record. So say the item number in a detail record is changed, then we would refresh that record by sending it to the server, which would set the changed fields, do the Sage 300 business logic operations (puts and gets) and return the newly updated record where a number of fields have changed.

This works for most cases, but there is room for optimization. If something is rather a major operation, you might want a more tailored AJAX call for the processing. Similarly, if multiple records are affected you might want to denormalize a bit to reduce the dataflow. For instance, when dealing with details, often header totals change, but you might want to associate these with the detail, rather than also refreshing the header.

Summary

This was a quick overview of the main modes or how our Sage 300 Web UIs operation. Stateless operation reduces server overhead, while stateful operation lets us fully leverage our existing business logic, while reducing our bandwidth requirements.

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Written by smist08

February 9, 2016 at 8:44 pm

2 Responses

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  1. […] Introduction When two computers communicate they use a well-defined communications protocol. In Browser to Server communications these are often broadly categorized as either stateless or stateful. A stateless communications protocol doesn’t require that anything be remembered between calls. In web applications this is desirable for a number of reasons: often calls are load balanced across…  […]

  2. […] at the simple case of checking a customer’s credit limit in A/R Invoice Entry (which is using a stateful business repository). We’ll start up in the JavaScript code and work our way down through the […]


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