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Posts Tagged ‘sage 300

On Calculating Dashboards

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Introduction

Most modern business applications have some sort of dashboard that displays a number of KPIs when you first sign-in. For instance here area a couple of KPIs from Sage 300 ERP:

s300portal

To be useful, these KPIs can involve quite sophisticated calculations to display relevant information. However users need to have their home page start extremely quickly so they can get on with their work. This article describes various techniques to calculate and present this information quickly. Starting with easy straight forward approaches progressing into more sophisticated methods utilizing the power of the cloud.

Simple Approach

The simplest way to program such a KPI is to leverage any existing calculations (or business logic) in the application and use that to retrieve the data. In the case of Sage 300 ERP this involves using the business logic Views which we’ve discussed in quite a few blog posts.

This usually gives a quick way to get something working, but often doesn’t exactly match what is required or is a bit slow to display.

Optimized Approach

Last week, we looked a bit at using the Sage 300 ERP .Net API to do a general SQL Query which could be used to optimize calculating a KPI. In this case you could construct a SQL statement to do exactly what you need and optimize it nicely in SQL Management Studio. In some cases this will be much faster than the Sage 300 Views, in some cases it won’t be if the business logic already does this.

Incremental Approach

Often KPIs are just sums or consolidations of lots of data. You cloud maintain the KPIs as you generate the data. So for each new batch posted, the KPI values are stored in another table and incrementally updated. Often KPIs are generated from statistics that are maintained as other operations are run. This is a good optimization approach but lacks flexibility since to customize it you need to change the business logic. Plus the more data that needs to be updated during posting will slow down the posting process, annoying the person doing posting.

Caching

As a next step you could cache the calculated values, so if the user has already executed a KPI once today then cache the value, so if they exit the program and then re-enter it then the KPIs can be quickly drawn by retrieving the values from the cache with no SQL or other calculations required.

For a web application like the Sage 300 Portal, rather than cache the data retrieved from the database or calculated, usually it would cache the JSON or XML data returned from the web service call that asked for the data. So when the web page for the KPI makes a request to the server, the cache just gives it the data to return to the browser, no formatting, calculation or anything else required.

Often if the cache lasts one day that is good enough, there can be a manual refresh button to get it recalculated, but mostly the user just needs to wait for the calculation once a day and then things are instant.

The Cloud

In the cloud, it’s quite easy to create virtual machines to run computations for you. It’s also quite easy to take advantage of various Big Data databases for storing large amounts of data (these are often referred to as NoSQL databases).

Cloud Approach

Cloud applications usually don’t calculate things when you ask for them. For instance when you do a Google search, it doesn’t really search anything, it looks up your search in a Big Data database, basically doing a database read that returns the HTML to display. The searching is actually done in the background by agents (or spiders) that are always running, searching the web and adding the data to the Big Data database.

In the cloud it’s pretty common to have lots or running processes that are just calculating things on the off chance someone will ask for it.

So in the above example there could be a process running at night the checks each user’s KPI settings and performs the calculation putting the data in the cache, so that the user gets the data instantly first thing in the morning, and unless they hit the manual refresh button, never wait for any calculations to be performed.

That helps things quite a bit but the user still needs to wait for a SQL query or calculation if they change the settings for their KPI or hits the manual refresh button. A sample KPI configuration screen from Sage 300 is:

s300portalconfig

As you can see from this example there are quite a few different configuration options, but in some sense not a truly rediculous number.

I’ve mentioned “Big Data” a few times in this article but so far all we’ve talked about is caching a few bits of data, but really the number of these being cached won’t be a very large number. Now suppose we calculate all possible values for this setup screen. Use the distributed computing powe of the cloud to do the calculations and then store all the possibilities in a “Big Data” database. This is much larger than we talked about previously, but we are barely scratching the surface of what these databases are meant to handle.

We are using the core functionality of the Big Data database, we are doing reads based on the inputs and returning the JSON (or XML or HTML) to display in the widget. As our cloud grows and we add more and more customers, the number of these will increase greatly, but  the Big Data database will just scale out using more and more servers to perform the work based on the current workload.

Then you can let these run all the time, so the values keep getting updated and even the refresh button (if you bother to keep it), will just get a new value from the Big Data cache. So a SQL query or other calculation is never triggered by a user action ever.

This is the spider/read model. Another would be to sync the application’s SQL database to a NoSQL database that then calculates the KPIs using MapReduce calculations. But this approach tends to be quite inflexible. However it can work if the sync’ing and transformation of the database solves a large number of queries at once. Creating such a database in a manner than the MapReduce queries all run fast is a rather nontrivial undertaking and runs the risk that in the end the MapReduces take too long to calculate. The two methods could also be combined, phase one would be to sync into the NoSQL database, then the spider processes calculate the caches doing the KPI calculations as MapReduce jobs.

This is all a lot of work and a lot of setup, but once in the cloud the customer doesn’t need to worry about any of this, just the vendor and with modern PaaS deployments this can all be automated and scaled easily once its setup correctly (which is a fair amount of work).

Summary

There are lots of techniques to produce/calculate business KPIs quickly. All these techniques are great, but if you have a cloud solution and you want its opening page to display in less that a second, you need more. This is where the power of the cloud can come in to pre-calculate everything so you never need to wait.

Written by smist08

February 14, 2015 at 7:25 pm

The Sage 300 SDLC

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Introduction

A lot of my blog posts are to answer questions that I frequently receive. Then I have a ready answer of a blog posting link, or perhaps people read my blog and it saves me receiving an e-mail. This blog posting is along the same lines as I get asked quite frequently about our SDLC (Software Development Lifecycle). Usually this is in regards to someone trying to fill out a giant RFP full of questions that are mostly irrelevant to purchasing ERP software.

I covered various aspects of our development process in other blog posting which I’ll refer to here. Plus our process is always evolving as we learn from our experiences and try to improve. What I’m writing about here is specifically what the development team for Sage 300 ERP does, but a lot of it is also used by other Sage teams on other projects. There are always slight variations as the different teams do have their own preferences and as long as they follow the general standards that’s ok.

Within R&D we use the Agile Development Methodology, but R&D exists within a larger context within Sage, much of which doesn’t use Agile frameworks. As a result our Agile development has to fit somewhat within a larger non-Agile system that tracks and coordinates the various projects going on around Sage. This is to ensure all departments know what is going on and can plan accordingly.

Not-Agile

We have a general PMO department that tracks all the various projects. It coordinates getting approval for projects, determining release criteria and coordinating all the various departments such as Marketing, Product Management, IS, etc. So they can do their pieces at the appropriate time.

Initial product ideas come from our Innovation Process, but before converting an innovation idea into a larger development effort there is usually some POC work and some initial rough estimates that then lead to a project kickoff process where an initial business plan, along with an initial project plan are presented and either approved or rejected.

The project is then tracked by PMO as it goes through development and then at the end when the Agile part of the development is done, there is a release certification meeting where all the stakeholders get together that the solution is ready for customers. This includes that the software is ready and of a high quality, but also that support is ready, training material is available, back end systems are setup to take orders, marketing is ready and all the other pieces that go into a product launch.

Web_SDLC_GoodPMO

Also at this time we run a final regression to ensure that everything is working correctly. Generally this is only a couple of weeks as a sanity check that the Agile process below worked correctly.

Before making the product available to all customers, we first spend a few months in a controlled release with a handful of live customers to ensure everything works well for them. This not only tests the software, but their ability to be on-boarded, supported and trained. After this has proceeded successfully then the product is made available for everyone.

Some of these reasons for this non-Agile framework is that a number of parts of our organization having adopted Agile yet and eventually they will need to if we are to have truly effective cloud based products. The other reason that I blogged about here, is the need to coordinate many disparate teams working on different parts of a larger solution.

Agile

Within R&D we use the Agile Development Methodology. I’ve blogged about Agile development a number of times: here, here, here, here and here.

We’ve been using Agile programming for a number of years now. We use 2 week sprints, have sprint planning, maintain a backlog, have daily standups, sprint demos, sprint retrospectives and all the other aspects of Agile. We use VersionOne to manage our projects. In Agile you execute the backlog story by story and have very tight rules on what it means for a story to be “done”. This way as each story is completed, it is fully tested, documented and ready for use. The important thing here is to not build up a large list of defects that need to be fixed near the end of the project. Basically when the last story is finished (done) then the product should be ready to put in customer’s hands.

agile

The doneness criteria vary a bit by Agile team, but here are the doneness criteria for a team on one of our current projects:

  • All tasks items in a backlog story have a closed status
  • The code builds successfully without compiler errors and warnings and without ReSharper issues
  • The code is deployed to test environment successfully
  • The code is checked into the correct repository and branch
  • The code conforms to Sage Branding Guidelines.
  • The code performs to performance standards
  • The code is reviewed for applicable use of all documented standards.
  • The code is refactored and reviewed for good OOP implementation
  • The code conforms to UX wireframes, design and CSS guidelines.
  • Code coverage minimum percentage is 70% with a target of +90%
  • The UI displays correctly in all supported browsers (IE, Safari, Firefox, Chrome)
  • Unit tests are included and run successfully
  • Automation tests are included and run successfully in test environment
  • The environment has not been corrupted (database, etc.)
  • The QA and QA Review tasks are included and complete
  • Reviewed and accepted by the Product Owner
  • Implement and document any build and/or deployment changes
  • Knowledge Transfer Activities (wiki updated, code walkthrough, group code review, etc.)
  • Remaining hours for tasks are set to zero and the backlog item is closed

 

Ensuring stories are done is the key to a well-run Agile process, probably more important than a well-structured prioritized backlog.

As part of developing for the cloud, we want to release fairly regularly and can’t afford long manual regression tests. As a result we have a lot of emphasis on Unit Tests and Automated tests, such as those blogged here.

Similarly branching strategy, source code management, build management and continuous integration are also important parts of this process.

Summary

This was a quick overview of our Sage 300 SDLC. With any big project there are always a lot of moving parts and these have to be tracked accurately and reliably. Agile doesn’t mean that we don’t have deadlines or firm requirements. It does mean that we develop the most important things first and build quality in from the very start.

How to Run Customized Sage 300 Screens from Sage CRM

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Introduction

From the Sage 300 ERP to Sage CRM integration there is the ability to run a number of Sage 300 ERP screens. These are the older VB screens being run as ActiveX controls from the IE browser. Not to be confused with the newer Quote to Order web based screens. A common request is how to customize these screens to you run the customized screen from Sage CRM rather than the base screen.

This blog posting covers how to run customized screens from Sage CRM. As a bonus, as part of this it also shows how to wrap a Sage 300 screen, so that it handles version updates seamlessly and doesn’t require you to re-compile your solution when we release a new version of the base screen. As a result this mechanism requires you use VB to wrap the base control for deployment. The ideas presented here probably can be ported to other programming systems, but it may not be easy.

A sample project that wraps Order Entry is located on Google Drive here. This project will be used for most of the examples in the document, so feel free to load it up and follow along.  In order to view the wrapper, simply unzip the file, and open up the CRMOEOrderUI.vbp.

Create the Wrapper

The following instructions will show the basic steps on how to create a Sage 300 UI Browser Wrapper.  The wrapper can then be referenced by an ASP page. There should be a constant interaction between the UI, the wrapper, and the ASP page (ie. UI calls UI_OnUIAppOpened in the wrapper, the wrapper raises the UIWasUnLoaded event to the ASP page, and the ASP page in turn catches the event, and closes the window containing the wrapper (and attached Accpac UI).

Instructions

1. Open up Visual Basic and select a new Active X Control. Click Open.

custcrm1

2. Go to Project/ References, and select ACCPAC COM API Object, ACCPAC Data Source Control, ACCPAC Signon Manager, VB IObjectSafety Interface, ACCPAC Application Installer, and ACCPAC Session Manager.

custcrm2

3. The project name determines the name of the wrapper (OCX).  In this case, the wrapper name will be “eCRMOEOrderUI”.

4. The name that you give the UserControl should be descriptive of what is contained on it.  In this case, give the UserControl the same name as the Accpac UI that is wrapped (in this case, OEOrderUI).

custcrm3

5. When you are coding refer to the Accpac UI as “UserControl” (ie. UserControl.Width, UserControl.height).

6. We use the VBControlExtender to wrap the Order Entry OCX control dynamically when UserControl_Show is called (see code for UserControl_Show accompanied with this document). When referencing elements and methods within the Order Entry OCX control you would use ctlDynamic.object. The control is installed and opened using the AccpacOcxRegHelper.CLS which makes entries in to the registry that allows the VBControlExtender to reference the control by name as opposed to CLSID which is returned from Roto.

custcrm4

7. Now you are ready to begin writing the code that will catch the events thrown by the Accpac UI, and raise your own events to the ASP that will contain your wrapper.

8. Go into your code view and begin instantiating your events, objects, and variables.

9. Begin by declaring your objects that are going to handle events thrown by the AccpacDataSource controls in the related Accpac OCX controls.  In this case, event handlers of the AccpacOE1100 class are being declared so that they can detect the events thrown by the class.

custcrm5

10. Next, declare the events that you will want to raise to the ASP page.

custcrm6

11. Declare your public variables

custcrm7

12. Declare your remaining variables.  In this case, mSignonMgr is going to be used to sign on the Accpac UI with the signon manager so that the signon screen does not keep popping up every time that the UI is loaded.  mlSignonID is going to be the signon ID.

custcrm8

13. Outline your functions that will be called by the ASP Page.  In this case, the ASP page will give the values that are to be used to populate the UI, or to insert the customer ID into the UI’s customer field for a new customer quote.

custcrm9
14. Next, list out the events that can be called by the UI AccpacDataSources.  In the screenshot below, you can see that the wrapper is checking the eReason variable being passed, and depending on what eReason is being passed, a different event will be raised to the ASP page (AddNew, Delete etc) in the RaiseEventEX sub.

custcrm10
custcrm11
custcrm12

 

15. Other functions are also called by the Accpac UI. The wrapper will be notified of these events through ctlDynamic_ObjectEvent (see below). Once the UI has opened ctlDynamic_ObjectEvent is called with an event name of  “OnUIAppOpened” and a private sub UI_OnUIAppOpened is called and objects in the wrapper are initialized, and the UIWasLoaded event is raised to the ASP page notifying it that the UI has been opened.
custcrm13
custcrm14

16. Finally, define the Get properties that are available to the ASP page so that it can resize its windows when the UI has been loaded onto the ASP page.  In this case, the ASP page will resize its windows to be the same width, height, and unit of measurement as the UI.

custcrm15

17. Now, you have successfully entered all the code that the wrapper will use to receive the function calls from the UI, as well as raise the events to the ASP page.

Customize the Sage CRM ASP Page

You now have a wrapped OCX now you can follow the ASP page in Sage CRM (for example, OE_OrderUI.asp as follows) to call your customized OCX.

http://bcr512115/CRM/CustomPages/Accpac/OE_OrderUI.asp?SID=15427674933819&Key0=1&Key1=44&Key2=58&F=Accpac/OE_Orders.asp&J=Accpac/OE_OrderUI.asp&QUOTENUM=ORD000000000076&CUSTID=AA20130815&DATABASE=SAMINC

Then it will open the OE Order Entry screen for order ORD000000000076.

In OE_OrderUI.asp file, it has following code:

 

<!–

eCRMOEOrderUI raises the following events:

UIWasLoaded(), UIWasUnLoaded(), AddNew(), Delete(), Update(), FieldChange(), Init(), Read(), Fetch()

eCRMOEOrderUI exposes the following Properties:

UIWidth(Read Only), UIHeight(Read Only), TwipsPerPixelX(Read Only), TwipsPerPixelX(Read Only)

eCRMOEOrderUI exposes the following Functions:

PopulateUI(OrderID As String, CustomerID As String);

CreateNewQuote(CustomerID As String);

–>

<SCRIPT for=”eCRMOEOrderUI” Event=”UIWasLoaded()”>

var width  = eCRMOEOrderUI.UIWidth / eCRMOEOrderUI.TwipsPerPixelX;

var height = eCRMOEOrderUI.UIHeight / eCRMOEOrderUI.TwipsPerPixelY;

if ((BrowserDetect.browser==”Explorer”) && (BrowserDetect.version >= 7))

{

width  += 35;

height += 130;

}

else

{

width  += 35;

height += 100;

}

var left = (screen.width – width) / 2;

var top = (screen.height – height) / 2;

window.resizeTo(width, height);

window.moveTo(left,top);

PopulateUI(<%=EnESCDocNum%>, <%=EnESCCustomer%>);

width  = eCRMOEOrderUI.UIWidth  / eCRMOEOrderUI.TwipsPerPixelX;

height = eCRMOEOrderUI.UIHeight / eCRMOEOrderUI.TwipsPerPixelY;

BorderWidth  = ClientWidth()  – width;

BorderHeight = ClientHeight() – height;

bLoaded = true;

resize();

</SCRIPT>

Summary

Hopefully you find this helpful in customizing Sage 300 ERP screens. Even if you don’t run them from Sage CRM, not having to re-build them for each Product Update can save you some time.

Written by smist08

October 11, 2014 at 4:14 pm

Sage Intelligence Go!

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Introduction

A new flavor of Sage Intelligence was demonstrated by Himanshu Palsule during his keynote at Sage Summit called Sage Intelligence Go! (SIG). I thought I’d spend a bit of time this week providing a few more details about what it is and where it fits into the scheme of things.

Sage Intelligence is a business intelligence/reporting tool used by many Sage ERP products. For those who have been around the Sage 300 ERP community, they will recognize it as Alchemex which Sage purchased a few years ago. This is a product that runs as a Microsoft Excel add-in which extracts data from the ERP to be manipulated by the power of the Excel spreadsheet engine. This is a very popular way of doing Financial Reporting since you often want to present the data graphically or you want to perform complex calculations or you want to slice and dice the data using pivot tables. Excel provides a great platform for performing these tasks. The original Financial Reporter bundled with Sage 300 ERP works in a similar manner as an Excel Add-in. Sage Intelligence is used for quite a few things beyond Financial Accounting including Sales Analysis and other predictive type BI functions.

Sage Intelligence has been around for a while and is a good mature product. Since it is written with the full Excel add-in SDK, it must run in Excel and specifically the locally installed version of Excel. This means it isn’t particularly well suited for cloud applications such as Office Online.

Microsoft has now released a newer SDK for developing Office apps. This new SDK is designed to allow you to develop applications that can still run in the locally installed full Microsoft Excel, but they can also run inside the cloud/web based Excel Online as well as the new specialty versions of Office like the one for the iPad.

As Sage ERP applications move to the cloud, you would want to have your Financial Reporter be cloud based as well. You would want to be able to edit Financial Reports in the browser as well as display and interact with reports on any device including your tablet or smart phone. This is where Sage Intelligence Go! comes in. It is written in the new Office Apps SDK and will run on the online and device version s of Excel as well as the full locally installed Excel. This you don’t need a Windows PC at all to use your cloud based ERP and cloud based Financial Reporter. However you still have all the power of Excel helping you visualize and manipulate your reports.

sig1

Sage One Accounting

Sage One Accounting by Sage Pastel is such a cloud based ERP system. This product has Sage Intelligence Go! as an option for performing various reporting needs. When SIG started out here, it was much simpler. The original Office Apps SDK was very simple and didn’t nearly have the power of the various older SDKs supported by local Excel. However as time as gone by, the Office App SDK has become much stronger and the functionality is now much more in line with what we expect of such a solution.

Office Apps

For those of you who attended Sage Summit and saw James Whittaker’s keynote, they would have seen the importance Microsoft is placing on the new Office Apps. Basically to switch from using the browser and search, or using Apps from a mobile device App store, you will get your data directly in your business applications via this new sort of App. If you go to the Office App Store, and search on Sage you will find a Sage One app for Outlook and Sage Intelligence Go! If you search a bit more broadly, you won’t find that many non-trivial applications. Sage Intelligence Go! is probably the most sophisticated Office App in the store.

Notice that you don’t run SIG reports from the ERP application, they run from Excel. Once you have the XLSX file, you can just run it anytime from any version of Excel and have full access to your data. This is really a new paradigm for doing reporting. For SIG this works really well. Whether other applications fit this model is yet to be seen.

Web Services

SIG needs to communicate both with the Office API (whether cloud or local) as well as with the ERP to get the data to process. Both of these functions are accomplished via RESTful web services. The communication with the ERP must be via Web Services since these could originate from the SIG Office App running in the Microsoft Office Online Cloud or from the Office App running in the local Excel. It isn’t possible to use the traditional methods of database integration like ODBC when the two may be running in completely different locations.

Basically the Sage Cloud based ERP exposes a standard set of Web Services that are protected by Sage ID. When the user starts SIG, they get a Sage ID login prompt from with-in Excel and then this is transmitted through to the Sage Cloud ERP which uses the Sage ID to look up which tenants this user runs as. This information is related back to SIG in case it needs a second prompt to act which tenant (company) to access.

Sage Intelligence Go consists of a server component that runs in the cloud as well as the Office App that runs in Excel. The Server portion of SIG uses the provided Web Services to load the data to be reported on from the ERP into its in-memory database for processing. This in-memory database is maintained in the cloud where the SIG service runs. Then the Office App part of SIG interacts with the server side to present the correct required data and perform various processing functions.

sig2

ERP Integration

This solution requires the ERP provide Web Services that are exposed to the Internet in general, so that it can be access via Excel running anywhere whether installed locally, running on an iPad or running as a Web Application in the cloud. This means these Web Services need to be secure and available 24×7 with very good availability. For this reason you will see SIG first integrating to Sage Cloud based ERPs (like the current Sage One Accounting by Sage Pastel) and later via the Sage Data Cloud which will offer these services on behalf of on-premised installed ERP systems.

Summary

Sage Intelligence Go! is our solution for cloud reporting. Its primary purpose is to provide Financial Reporting capabilities, but it is also capable of handling other BI type reporting needs. This is our solution to moving a lot of reporting functions into the cloud.

sig3

 

 

Sage Summit 2014

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Introduction

I’m just back from Sage Summit 2014 which was held at the Mandalay Bay Resort/Hotel in Las Vegas, Nevada. There were over 5200 attendees at the show, a new record for Sage. The Mandalay Bay is a huge complex and I racked up a record number of steps for GCC getting from one place to another. Las Vegas is easy to get to for most people since there are a lot of direct flights from around North America and you can find really cheap hotel accommodation near to the conference (like $29 at the Excalibur which is connected to Mandalay Bay by a free tram). The only down side to having he conference in Vegas is that smoking is still allowed in many public places, which is really annoying.

The conference had a great many guest speakers including quite a few celebrities like Magic Johnson and Jessica Alba. The convention trade show wasn’t just booths, there were also open speaking theatres that always had something interesting going on as well as the Sage Innovation Lab Exhibit.

There were a great many product breakout sessions as well as a large number of breakout sessions on general business and technology topics. The intent was to make Sage Summit a place to come to for a lot more than just learning new technical details about your Sage product, or promoting new add-ons for you to purchase. A lot of customers attending the show told me that it was these general sessions on accounting, marketing and technology that they found the most useful.

The show was huge and this blog post just covers a few areas that I was directly involved in or attended.

Great General Sessions

Besides the mandatory Sage keynotes, there were quite a few general sessions which were quite amazing. My favorite was Brad Smith’s interview with Biz Stone the co-founder of Twitter and Jelly. Biz certainly provides a lot of interesting context to Web startups, as well as a lot of interesting stories of why he left Google and chose the path he chose. It was certainly interesting in the way a lot of the successful founders left very secure lucrative careers to really struggle for years to get their dreams off the ground. A common theme was the need for persistence so you could survive long enough to eventually get that big break. Another common theme was to follow people and ideas rather than companies and money. Now I’m going to have to read Biz’s book: “Things a Little Bird Told Me: Confessions of the Creative Mind”.

bizstone

Another very popular session was the panel discussion with Magic Johnson, CEO of Magic Johnson Enterprises, Jessica Alba, co-founder of the Honest Company and J. Carrey Smith, CEO of Big Ass Solutions. This discussion concentrated on their current businesses and didn’t delve into their celebrity pasts for which at least two panelists are rather well known for. There were a lot of good business tips given and it was interesting to see how Magic Johnson and Jessica Alba have adapted what they did before to becoming quite successful CEOs.

magicalba

Sage’s Technology Vision

A lot of Sage’s technology and product presentations were about our mobile and cloud technology vision. The theme was to aggressively move into these areas with purposeful innovation that still protect the investment that our customers have in our current technologies. At the heart of this vision is the Sage Data Cloud. This acts as a hub which mobile solutions can connect to as well as a way that data can be accessed in our existing products whether in the cloud or installed on premise. Below is the architectural block diagram showing the main components of this.

sagetech2

This is perhaps a bit theoretical, but we already have products in the market that are filling in key components of this vision. Some of these are included in the next diagram.

sagetech1

We use the term “hybrid cloud” quite a bit, this indicates that you can have some of your data on premise and some of your data in the cloud. There are quite a few use cases that people desire. Not everyone is sold with trusting all their data to a cloud vendor for safe keeping. In some industries and countries there are tight regulatory controls on where your data can legally be located. The Hybrid Cloud box in the diagram includes Sage 50 ERP (US and Canadian), Sage 100 ERP and Sage 300 ERP.

To effectively operate mobile and web solutions, you do need to have your data available 24×7 with a very high degree of uptime and a very high degree of security. Most small or mid-sized business customers cannot afford sufficient IT resources to maintain this for their own data center. One solution to this problem is to synchronize a subset of your on premise ERP/CRM data to the Sage Data Cloud and then have your mobile solutions accessing this. Then it becomes Sage’s responsibility to maintain the uptime, 24×7 support and apply all the necessary security procedures to keep the data safe.

Another attraction for ISVs is integrate their product to the Sage Data Cloud and then let the Sage Data Cloud handle all the details of integrating to the many Sage ERP products. This way they only need to write one integration rather than separate integrations for Sage 50 ERP, Sage 100 ERP, Sage 300 ERP, Sage 300 CRE, etc.

We had a lot of coverage of the Sage 300 Online offering which has been live for a while now. This was introduced last Summit and now offers Sage 300 ERP customers the choice of installing on premise or running in the Azure cloud. Running in the cloud saves you having to back up your data, perform updates or maintain servers or operating systems. This way you can just run Sage 300 and let Sage handle the details. Of course you can get a copy of your data anytime you want and even move between on premise and the cloud.

The Sage Innovation Lab

On the trade show we had a special section for the Sage Innovation Lab. Here you could play with Google Glasses, Pebble Watches, 3D Printers and all sorts of neat toys to see some prototypes and experiments that Sage is working on with these. We don’t know if these will all be productized, but it’s cool to get a feel for how the future might begin to look like.

Summary

This really was Sage Summit re-imagined. There were a great many sessions, keynotes and demonstrations on all sorts of topics of interest to businesses. This should be taken even further for next year’s Sage Summit which will be in New Orleans, LA on July 27-30, 2015. Does anyone else remember all those great CA-World’s in New Orleans back in the 90s?

Written by smist08

August 2, 2014 at 8:07 pm

Using the Sage 300 .Net Helper APIs

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Introduction

The main purpose of our .Net API is to access our Business Logic Views which I’ve blogged on in these articles:

An Introduction to the Sage 300 ERP .Net API
Starting to Program the Sage 300 ERP Views in .Net
Composing Views in the Sage 300 ERP .Net API
Using the Sage 300 ERP View Protocols with .Net
Using Browse Filters in the Sage 300 ERP .Net API
Using the Sage 300 .Net API from ASP.Net MVC
Error Reporting in Sage 300 ERP
Sage 300 ERP Metadata
Sage 300 ERP Optional Fields

However there are a number of simple things that you need to do repeatedly which would be a bit of a pain to use the Views every time to do these. So in our .Net API we provide a number of APIs that give you efficient quick mechanisms to access things like company, fiscal calendar and currency information.

With Sage Summit 2014 just a few weeks away (you can still register here), I can’t pre-empt any of the big announcements here in my blog (as much as I’d like to), so perhaps a bit of an easier .Net article instead. For many these examples are fairly simple, but I’m always getting requests for source code, and I happen to have a test program that exercises these APIs that I can provide as an examples. This program was to help ensure and debug these APIs for our 64 Bit/Unicode version which might indicate why it tends to print rather a strange selection of fields from some of the classes.

Sample Program

The sample program for this article is a simple WinForms application that uses the Sage 300 ERP API to get various information from these helper classes and then populates a multi-line edit control with the information gathered. The code is the dotnetsample (folder or zip) located in the folder on Google Drive at this URL. The code is hard coded to access SAMLTD with ADMIN/ADMIN as the user id and password. You may need to change this in the session.open to match what you have installed/configured on your local system. I’ve been building and running this using Visual Studio 2013 with the latest SPs and the latest .Net.

dotnetsample

The Session Class

The session class is the starting point for everything else. Besides opening the session get establishing the DBLink, you can use this class to get some useful version information as well as some information about the user like their language.

The DBLink Class

From the session you get a DBLink object that is then your connection to the database and everything in it. From this object you can open any of our Business Logic Views and do any processing that you like. Similarly you can also get quick access to currency and fiscal calendar information from here. Of course you could do much of this by opening various Common Service Views, but this would involve quite a few calls. Additionally the helper APIs provide some caching and calculation support.

The Company Class

Accessing the company property from the DBLink object is your quick shortcut to the various Company options information stored in Common Services in the CS0001 View. This is where you get things like the home currency, number of fiscal periods, whether the company is multi-currency or get address type information. Generally you will need something from here in pretty much anything you do.

The FiscalCalendar Class

You can get a FiscalCalendar object from the FiscalCalendar property of the DBLink. In accounting fiscal periods are very important, since everything is eventually recorded in the General Ledger in a specific fiscal year/fiscal period. G/L mostly doesn’t care about exact dates, but really cares about the fiscal year and period. For accurate accounting you always have to be very careful that you are putting things in the correct fiscal year and periods. In Common Services we setup our financial years and fiscal periods assigning them various starting and ending dates. Corporate fiscal years don’t have to correspond to a calendar year and usually don’t. For instance the Sage fiscal year starts on October 1, and ends on September 30.

This object then gives you methods and properties to get the starting and ending dates for fiscal periods, years or quarters. Further it helps you calculate which fiscal year/period a particular date falls in. Often all these calculations are done for you by the Views, but if you are entering things directly into G/L these can be quite useful. Some of the parameters to these methods are a bit cryptic, so perhaps the sample program will help with anyone having troubles.

The Currency Classes

There are several classes for dealing with currencies, there are the Currency, CurrencyTable and CurrencyRate classes. You get these from the DBLink’s GetCurrency, GetCurrencyTable and GetCurrencyRate methods. There is also a GetCurrencyRateTypeDescription method to get the description for a given Currency Rate Type.

The Currency object contains information for a given currency like the description, number of decimals and decimal separator. Combined with the Currency Rate Type, we have a Currency Table entry for each Currency Code and Currency Rate Type. Then for each of these there are multiple CurrencyRate’s for each Currency on a given date.

So if you want to do some custom currency processing for some reason, then these are very useful objects to use. The sample program for this article has lots of examples of using all of these.

Remember to always test your programs against a multi-currency database. A common bug is to do all your testing against SAMINC and then have your program fail at a customer site who is running multi-currency. Similarly it helps to test with a home currency like Japanese Yen that doesn’t have two decimal places.

Summary

This was just a quick article to talk about some of the useful helper functions in our Sage 300 ERP .Net API that help you access various system data quickly. You can perform any of these functions through the Business Logic Views, but since these are used so frequently, they save a lot of programming time.

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