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How to Run Customized Sage 300 Screens from Sage CRM

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Introduction

From the Sage 300 ERP to Sage CRM integration there is the ability to run a number of Sage 300 ERP screens. These are the older VB screens being run as ActiveX controls from the IE browser. Not to be confused with the newer Quote to Order web based screens. A common request is how to customize these screens to you run the customized screen from Sage CRM rather than the base screen.

This blog posting covers how to run customized screens from Sage CRM. As a bonus, as part of this it also shows how to wrap a Sage 300 screen, so that it handles version updates seamlessly and doesn’t require you to re-compile your solution when we release a new version of the base screen. As a result this mechanism requires you use VB to wrap the base control for deployment. The ideas presented here probably can be ported to other programming systems, but it may not be easy.

A sample project that wraps Order Entry is located on Google Drive here. This project will be used for most of the examples in the document, so feel free to load it up and follow along.  In order to view the wrapper, simply unzip the file, and open up the CRMOEOrderUI.vbp.

Create the Wrapper

The following instructions will show the basic steps on how to create a Sage 300 UI Browser Wrapper.  The wrapper can then be referenced by an ASP page. There should be a constant interaction between the UI, the wrapper, and the ASP page (ie. UI calls UI_OnUIAppOpened in the wrapper, the wrapper raises the UIWasUnLoaded event to the ASP page, and the ASP page in turn catches the event, and closes the window containing the wrapper (and attached Accpac UI).

Instructions

1. Open up Visual Basic and select a new Active X Control. Click Open.

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2. Go to Project/ References, and select ACCPAC COM API Object, ACCPAC Data Source Control, ACCPAC Signon Manager, VB IObjectSafety Interface, ACCPAC Application Installer, and ACCPAC Session Manager.

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3. The project name determines the name of the wrapper (OCX).  In this case, the wrapper name will be “eCRMOEOrderUI”.

4. The name that you give the UserControl should be descriptive of what is contained on it.  In this case, give the UserControl the same name as the Accpac UI that is wrapped (in this case, OEOrderUI).

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5. When you are coding refer to the Accpac UI as “UserControl” (ie. UserControl.Width, UserControl.height).

6. We use the VBControlExtender to wrap the Order Entry OCX control dynamically when UserControl_Show is called (see code for UserControl_Show accompanied with this document). When referencing elements and methods within the Order Entry OCX control you would use ctlDynamic.object. The control is installed and opened using the AccpacOcxRegHelper.CLS which makes entries in to the registry that allows the VBControlExtender to reference the control by name as opposed to CLSID which is returned from Roto.

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7. Now you are ready to begin writing the code that will catch the events thrown by the Accpac UI, and raise your own events to the ASP that will contain your wrapper.

8. Go into your code view and begin instantiating your events, objects, and variables.

9. Begin by declaring your objects that are going to handle events thrown by the AccpacDataSource controls in the related Accpac OCX controls.  In this case, event handlers of the AccpacOE1100 class are being declared so that they can detect the events thrown by the class.

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10. Next, declare the events that you will want to raise to the ASP page.

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11. Declare your public variables

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12. Declare your remaining variables.  In this case, mSignonMgr is going to be used to sign on the Accpac UI with the signon manager so that the signon screen does not keep popping up every time that the UI is loaded.  mlSignonID is going to be the signon ID.

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13. Outline your functions that will be called by the ASP Page.  In this case, the ASP page will give the values that are to be used to populate the UI, or to insert the customer ID into the UI’s customer field for a new customer quote.

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14. Next, list out the events that can be called by the UI AccpacDataSources.  In the screenshot below, you can see that the wrapper is checking the eReason variable being passed, and depending on what eReason is being passed, a different event will be raised to the ASP page (AddNew, Delete etc) in the RaiseEventEX sub.

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15. Other functions are also called by the Accpac UI. The wrapper will be notified of these events through ctlDynamic_ObjectEvent (see below). Once the UI has opened ctlDynamic_ObjectEvent is called with an event name of  “OnUIAppOpened” and a private sub UI_OnUIAppOpened is called and objects in the wrapper are initialized, and the UIWasLoaded event is raised to the ASP page notifying it that the UI has been opened.
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16. Finally, define the Get properties that are available to the ASP page so that it can resize its windows when the UI has been loaded onto the ASP page.  In this case, the ASP page will resize its windows to be the same width, height, and unit of measurement as the UI.

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17. Now, you have successfully entered all the code that the wrapper will use to receive the function calls from the UI, as well as raise the events to the ASP page.

Customize the Sage CRM ASP Page

You now have a wrapped OCX now you can follow the ASP page in Sage CRM (for example, OE_OrderUI.asp as follows) to call your customized OCX.

http://bcr512115/CRM/CustomPages/Accpac/OE_OrderUI.asp?SID=15427674933819&Key0=1&Key1=44&Key2=58&F=Accpac/OE_Orders.asp&J=Accpac/OE_OrderUI.asp&QUOTENUM=ORD000000000076&CUSTID=AA20130815&DATABASE=SAMINC

Then it will open the OE Order Entry screen for order ORD000000000076.

In OE_OrderUI.asp file, it has following code:

 

<!–

eCRMOEOrderUI raises the following events:

UIWasLoaded(), UIWasUnLoaded(), AddNew(), Delete(), Update(), FieldChange(), Init(), Read(), Fetch()

eCRMOEOrderUI exposes the following Properties:

UIWidth(Read Only), UIHeight(Read Only), TwipsPerPixelX(Read Only), TwipsPerPixelX(Read Only)

eCRMOEOrderUI exposes the following Functions:

PopulateUI(OrderID As String, CustomerID As String);

CreateNewQuote(CustomerID As String);

–>

<SCRIPT for=”eCRMOEOrderUI” Event=”UIWasLoaded()”>

var width  = eCRMOEOrderUI.UIWidth / eCRMOEOrderUI.TwipsPerPixelX;

var height = eCRMOEOrderUI.UIHeight / eCRMOEOrderUI.TwipsPerPixelY;

if ((BrowserDetect.browser==”Explorer”) && (BrowserDetect.version >= 7))

{

width  += 35;

height += 130;

}

else

{

width  += 35;

height += 100;

}

var left = (screen.width – width) / 2;

var top = (screen.height – height) / 2;

window.resizeTo(width, height);

window.moveTo(left,top);

PopulateUI(<%=EnESCDocNum%>, <%=EnESCCustomer%>);

width  = eCRMOEOrderUI.UIWidth  / eCRMOEOrderUI.TwipsPerPixelX;

height = eCRMOEOrderUI.UIHeight / eCRMOEOrderUI.TwipsPerPixelY;

BorderWidth  = ClientWidth()  – width;

BorderHeight = ClientHeight() – height;

bLoaded = true;

resize();

</SCRIPT>

Summary

Hopefully you find this helpful in customizing Sage 300 ERP screens. Even if you don’t run them from Sage CRM, not having to re-build them for each Product Update can save you some time.

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Written by smist08

October 11, 2014 at 4:14 pm

Sage CRM 7.2 Available for Sage 300 ERP

with 8 comments

Introduction

Earlier this year Sage CRM 7.2 was released for standalone CRM customers. We have competed the Sage 300 ERP integration in conjunction with the Service Pack 1 release of Sage CRM 7.2. We have now released the Sage 300 ERP 2012 integration for Sage CRM 7.2 and this is the integration that will be included in the forthcoming Sage 300 ERP 2014 release.

Generally customers find that combining Sage CRM as a front office solution to Sage 300 ERP as the back office  solution creates a much more powerful combined system than having separate ERP and CRMs. The level of automation, reporting and customer connectedness is greatly increased across the organization. As such introducing a new version of CRM can provide many immediate benefits for companies and this blog is looking at some of the things that are new in this version. We find that customers running both of these Sage products together have much higher net promoter scores than customers running non-integrated systems.

Social CRM

Historically CRM programs managed communications with customers and other business contacts by managing e-mails and phone calls. CRM had all the basic contact information, integrations to help automate these processes like creating e-mails and automatically recording the information in CRM. Auto-dialing phones and logging that you called and letting you fill in some comments. Setting reminders and schedules for performing these tasks.

However, how we are communicating with our business contacts is changing. Many people are using e-mail and voice phones much less than they used to. I ignore most incoming calls from unknown callers because they are usually cold sales calls or scams (like you have just won a cruise vacation). E-mail is getting much noisier with spam and other junk, causing more important e-mails to just get lost. It’s been found that recent high school graduates actually have quite an aversion to actually talking on a phone and don’t use e-mail much.

Now there are many more communication channels. Many people now communicate via various social websites like Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+, Yammer and Twitter. Many calls are made via services like Skype and there are people texting more than ever and even using systems like BBM.

So if we want to get a complete comprehensive picture of all our communications with a customer, we need to see all of these in CRM as well. We added LinkedIn and Twitter connectors to Sage CRM last version and with this version we have added Facebook integration.

socialcrm

With this Facebook integration you can bring Facebook information right inside Sage CRM to better understand your customer. You can associate Facebook pictures and profiles with prospects. Generally this is an avenue to get a more complete picture of your customer, or potential customer’s business.

Getting good leads is usually a big problem for companies. Chances are that for a given customer, his contacts will be related in some way and perhaps offer good prospects to market to. If you do get a response from one of a customer’s contacts then you can use the original customer as a reference to help make the sale, or act as an introduction to get you in the door.

Social Media stores terabytes and terabytes of information on business’s and people. Being able to effectively mine all this information is going to be a huge competitive advantage in the future.

Another social feature added to Sage CRM 7.2 is Yammer integration. Yammer is a social network for collaboration within a company. With this integration your sales teams can collaborate and share information using Yammer from Sage CRM.

socialcrm3

Mobile CRM

People don’t necessarily spend their entire day sitting at their desk behind a computer. They work from home, they travel on business trips and visit customers face to face. You CRM system contains tons of useful information that will help you do your job better if accessible in these situations. Over the past couple of versions and further with this new version, we‘ve been adding mobile features to Sage CRM to make it easier to access from mobile devices.

Sage CRM is a web application and with the previous version we enhanced to work with all popular browsers. This then allowed mobile users (which usually have Safari or Chrome) to browse the Sage CRM screens. Perhaps this works a bit better for tablets, but tends to be a bit of a pain on an iPhone.

As a result we’ve been adding native device apps to complement the web interface to Sage CRM. Plus we’ve been working on improving the web interface so it will work much better on table devices like the iPad.

The picture below shows the Sage CRM web application rendering itself for an iPad:

mobilecrm1

Next we have the iPhone native Sage CRM application:

mobilecrm2

And finally the Sage CRM 7.2 Windows 8 application for Windows tablets:

mobilecrm3

As we move forwards we will be providing more and more functionality on more and more mobile devices so you can instantly get any information you need instantly. Down the road you might be wearing your Google glasses and when you say the customer’s name, all the information on that customer will be right there in your view to reference.

Reporting

With this version of Sage CRM we’ve improved the reporting capabilities. A new HTML5 based charting library has been added, so you don’t need Adobe Flash for charts anymore. You can clone reports to get started with a customization. There are more chart types with more configurable settings. There are new security settings so you can better control who can see what.

Customization

Sage CRM 7.2 adds more codeless customization capability where you can design more powerful screens right in the product without writing code. Sage CRM also doesn’t use frames to hold custom screens anymore. This will affect some ASP based customizations, but generally leads to better ability to control your own web pages (especially the CSS).

Integration

The main change to the Sage 300 ERP integration was changing Quotes to Orders to work in the new frameless Sage CRM web pages. Most other changes have already been released in service packs or hotfixes for Sage 300 ERP 2012, so if you are fully current you won’t see much different. But if you are coming from an older version, you should see a number of improvements.

Summary

Sage CRM 7.2 integrated with Sage 300 ERP make for a powerful front/back office solution. This release is definitely worth checking out especially for the mobility and social features.

Written by smist08

September 7, 2013 at 4:59 pm

Sage Summit 2013

with 7 comments

Introduction

Sage Summit is our annual North American partner and customer conference. This year it was held at the Gaylord National Resort and Convention Center in Washington, DC. Sage rolled out many exciting new products, upgrades and services. As a blogger I’m glad that they’ve all now been announced since these will provide articles for months to come and I don’t have to hold back waiting for Sage Summit anymore. Most of the topics mentioned here quickly will be the topic for future much more detailed blog postings.

Keynotes

Pascal Houillon kicked off the opening keynote comparing the Sage journey to mountain climbing. Talking about teamwork and overcoming very daunting obstacles. There was also a lot of mention on progress with building the Sage brand in North America.

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Included in the keynote were demos of some of Sage’s new mobile applications, showing people buying things from iPads, being dispatched to perform service work from their iPhone and entering construction time card data on an Android tablet. The best demo was Steve Malmgren demoing voice input on a Windows phone where he could just ask general questions with vague input data and get back meaningful answers. He could ask questions like “What’s the address of American in Milwaukee?” and get back the full company name, its address and go to a map to get directions. It was very impressive and the voice recognition worked really well considering the noisy conditions up on stage.

Then the keynotes broke out into several super-sessions. I attended the super-session on technology which was standing room only. This session outlined all our new technology initiatives and all the things that we were delivering now. These included several mobile native applications along with the announcement of the new Sage 300 Online. A lot of time was invested in explaining how the provisioning and signup processes worked and how ISVs can participate in the new Sage Data Cloud that is the backbone for all the new services.

Sage Mobile Applications

We previewed rough prototypes of a number of mobile applications at last year’s Sage Summit conference. This year we are releasing the real things. The first three mobile applications are Sage Mobile Sales, Sage Billing and Payment and Sage Mobile Service.

Sage Mobile Sales is an iPad native application for sales people, Sage Mobile Service is an iPhone native application for receiving service calls. Sage Billing and Payment is a web application for chasing down people who owe you money. All of these take credit cards for payment via Sage Payment Solutions.

Below are some screen shots to give a flavor of what they look like.

mobile1

Sage Data Cloud

All these Sage Mobile Applications are connected to the Sage Data Cloud. All the data required for these applications to run, as well as all the transactions they generate go through the Sage Data Cloud. The Sage Data Cloud is hosted in Microsoft Azure and is connected to your on-premise ERP system. Your on-premise ERP uploads to data to the cloud like customer and inventory information and then downloads transactions like orders and invoices. It is the glue that connects your on-premise ERP with the cloud world without requiring you to run a web server or any other special infrastructure.

sagedatacloud

Currently we have connectors to the Sage Data Cloud for Sage 100 ERP and Sage 300 ERP. With connectors to Sage 50 ERP (US and Canadian) to be available shortly.

Sage 300 Online

Sage 300 Online is our new cloud version. This runs Sage 300 ERP 2014 in the Microsoft Azure cloud. It is integrated with SageID and uses new virtualization technology to being an improved application experience.

The following is the web page that you would launch the Sage 300 ERP 2014 Desktop from or transfer data to/from the cloud.

s300online

Sage 300 ERP 2014

Sage 300 ERP 2014 is our new version that will be shipping in a couple of months. This version includes many user interface improvements in the main Desktop along with throughout many application screens. There is much more information on what people are doing in the system, improved visual process flows and a number of other improvements that people have been asking for.

Sage City

We introduced Sage City last year and have continued it this year due to popular demand. Sage City includes a keynote address for the Sage Customers, it then breaks up into networking/problem solving sessions where like-minded customers get together to jointly solve their problems.

Sage Marketplace Live Expo

Every year there is an exhibition hall which has booths representing all our main ISV partners. All the Sage business applications act as both a platform and a center for a whole ecosystem of products and services. These products range from small but useful utilities all the way up to major applications and all have the goal of seamlessly integrating with various Sage products. Many lunches, breakfasts and dinners were served here so that partners and customers could eat as well as have plenty of time to investigate all the various products that could make their lives easier.

Social Media

Like any conference, one of the goals is to promote the company and to generate coverage in the press. Besides getting articles written for various publications (mostly online), part of it is generating interest in the social media like Twitter, LinkedIn or Facebook. Seeing all the tweets by industry analysts as well as judging sentiment from the attendees by watching the twitter feeds. You can see this by searching for the hashtag #SageSummit. Often the twitter feeds were displayed on large screens for all to see. Plus Twitter is a great way of people to connect and exchange information. There was also a Sage Summit conference mobile application to show the conference agenda as well as allow people to connect and use social media. Plus points were awarded for using the app where people were competing for a prize.

Summary

Sage Summit 2013 was another enjoyable conference. It was a great opportunity to meet many partners and customers. To see all the great products our ISV community are working on. To see some products and people from other parts of Sage that I don’t normally interact with. Next year Sage Summit is in Las Vegas at Mandalay Bay on July 27-August 1, 2014.

Written by smist08

July 26, 2013 at 12:52 pm

Introducing Sage City Online

with one comment

Introduction

Last year at Sage Summit in Nashville we tried an experiment in social networking that we called Sage City. I mentioned this in my blog on Sage Summit 2012 here. Sage City in Nashville was a huge success and we will be building on that for an even better Sage City event at this year’s Sage Summit conference in Washington, DC.

Last week we opened the online version of Sage City. The intent is to build a social networking super-site for all Sage customers, partners and employees.

sagecity1

History

There has always been a lot of social networking around Sage and its products. Typically each product group or division operated its own set of forums and blogs. This is then hard for customers who use several products like say Sage CRM and Sage ERP. They need to join several disparate communities, which are all quite different.

There are all sort of groups on the main social networking sites like Facebook or LinkedIn. Many of these groups are highly successful with thousands of members. For instance the Sage Partners, Employees & Alumni Networking Group on LinkedIn has over 8200 members and has lots of interesting activity.

The external groups are doing great and will continue to do so. But something needed to be done about all the internal groups. Many were running different software platforms, used different sign-on ids, looked quite different, and had different policies and so on.

Unify the Sage Social Sites

The first goal of Sage City was to unify all these different Sage social communities into one place. Basically a Sage customer now only needs to sign up for Sage City and then they can join discussions on many Sage products as well as reference all sorts of other on-line resources. Now all the Sage forums are using the same software, they all work the same way and they will all be updated and maintained together providing a unified experience. Below is just the start of quite long list of support communities available on Sage City:

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Notice that we now have both unified customer communities as well as unified partner communities.

You might ask: What about all the great content in all the previous discussion forums and blogs? The Sage City team did a great job of bringing all this content over to the new site. This isn’t an empty site waiting to be filled, there are already hundreds of blog postings and thousands of discussion forum threads imported from the older sites. This provides a great resource of information that has already been captured.

Business Communities

If you attended Sage Summit last year, you know that Sage City wasn’t organized around products, it was organized around business interests. Now that we’ve brought together all the different product social sites into one place, this now gives us a great opportunity to build on this new greater expanded community.

Across all the different Sage business products there is a lot of commonality in professional function. For instance there are many Accountants using Sage ERP products. Sage City offers social sites for all of these. In the screen shot below is the start of the list of the various business communities that are available on Sage City:

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The key to their success is that these communities are large enough to be vibrant and self-sustaining. By bringing together the larger Sage community we can achieve this.

Most business issues and problems don’t have anything to do with ERP or CRM software and these new forums offer a great opportunity to discuss these with knowledgeable peers in a community of like minded people.

A True Social Site

Besides unifying all our various discussion forums and blogs, the new Sage City site also offers many of the expected social features that you would expect on any modern Social Media site. You can have friends, follow people, like things, join groups, send messages, mark favorites, subscribe to RSS feeds, and post comments and replies.

The site is integrated with Twitter feeds and with Sage’s product idea site.

There are discussion forums, blogs and videos. There are feeds showing all the activities going on either on the whole site or just in a specific group.

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A Platform to Build On

Last week was the initial launch, but we have a large enthusiastic team that continues to work on Sage City, so you can expect to see regular updates and enhancements to make this a continually growing and more and more vibrant site.

The first goal is to attract as many people as possible to the site. The strength and value of a community is built on the enthusiasm of the individual participants. A strong community is a powerful thing. Hopefully by bringing together all the customers, partners and employees from separate Sage product camps we can build a much more valuable community than we could acting separately.

Summary

Sage City is now live. Sage City is so new the Google Spiders haven’t even cataloged its contents yet. But I think Sage City is a great improvement over Sage’s separate product social site. There are already lots of active users and discussions. I’ll be contributing regularly and I hope to see you there as well.

 

Our Sage R&D Leadership Conference at Newport Beach

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Introduction

This past week I had the privilege of attending a Sage Leadership conference that was put on for about 40 of the key Sage North American R&D Leaders. It was held over two days at the Newport Beach Hyatt Hotel. Newport Beach is a beautiful spot with Balboa Island and Back Bay in easy walking distance along with a number of good restaurants. The intent of the conference was to give people a chance to get away from the daily grind of problem solving and routine management to really concentrate on leadership. This is very important at Sage right now as the company is going through a large number of changes to adapt to the fast changing technology/societal landscape that we are now living in.

We had an artist drawing visually what we were doing, so in this blog posting I’ve added a few of her drawings on the relevant topics. They are really quite good and much better than getting an e-mail of PowerPoint presentations.

Sage Vision

The conference got off to a rocky start when the group was asked to stand if you could recite the Sage Vision statement and only a couple of people on the executive committee stood. This then led into a discussion about the Sage brand and the Sage Vision.

Just to be clear, the Sage brand isn’t just the Sage logo and the Sage Vision isn’t just some feel good marketing text that we put under the logo on our brochures. These aren’t about marketing at all, they are about defining the company that we want to become. The Sage Vision statement is:

To be recognized as the most valuable supporter of small and medium sized companies by creating greater freedom for them to succeed.

We then spent time breaking apart and analyzing this statement and then ensuring that what we are working on today aligns with this vision. Some of the key parts of this statement are that we will be recognized, that we do provide value in everything we do, it defines our market segment and defines our goal. We want to give our customers freedom from dealing with accounting matters so that they can concentrate on their real business whatever that may be.

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Leadership

After fully drinking the vision cool-aide, we then went about discussing and talking about leadership. A lot of this revolved around being a confident leader. In our ability to inspire our co-workers and to get all the cats moving in the same direction.

We discussed leadership attributes that we at Sage do well, but more importantly we spent more time discussing the leadership attributes that we are lacking and how to develop these.

The diagram then gives a good representation of what was discussed:

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Customer Connectedness

Rather than doing a Clint Eastwood and having the customer represented by an empty chair, we actually invited a couple of customers to kick off the second day. We started with a question and answer session to learn about their businesses, to learn about the problems that they are having, about what is working well. Not just for their ERP system but for their whole business in all its aspects.

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We were asked to take notes and then when the Q&A was over, the second part was to have our own Shark Tank show. Each table became a team (about five people each) and had 45 minutes to come up with a product idea to pitch to the sharks which in this case were our two visiting customers. They then judged the ideas and awarded a bottle of monopoly money to the team that they wanted to invest in.

This exercise was a lot of fun and was a good exercise of the creative juices. The winning ideas are then going to be fed into our innovation process to see if other customers also think they are good ideas.

It was interesting to watch, since this was entirely developers, that they fell into the same traps that we usually blame Product Management for, namely answering “yes it can” to every question and under pressure on pricing to keep lowing it until it’s a free service.

Innovation

A primary goal of the conference was to foster more innovation in everything we do. One fun exercise was to have all the tables go off into their own groups and put together a play or skit on a day in the life of someone using technology ten years into the future. I blogged on my vision of ERP in 2020 a couple of years ago here. Certainly my vision of ten years into the future was way more conservative than anything envisioned here. Center stage went to voice interaction and general direct input into the brain. In a way projected where technologies like Siri and Google Now along with Google Glasses will be in ten years.

The key theme is that no one will be keying in ERP transactions anymore. You will just do business by chatting and gesturing, sign contracts by shaking hands and all the debits and credits will happen magically (via technology) in the background.

Summary

The conference was a great deal of fun and highly successful. It was good to meet a number of people I’ve only dealt with via e-mail in person finally, as well as a number of people I didn’t know at all. It was good to ensure we are all aligned and working to the same vision and that we are all innovating together toward a common goal of really providing that freedom for our customers to succeed. But more importantly there are a number of things for me to start doing immediately on returning to the office.

Newport_Beach

Written by smist08

March 2, 2013 at 3:35 am

The End of the Smart Phone Era?

with 9 comments

Introduction

I saw this article in Business Insider “The End of the Smart Phone Era is Coming” and was just wondering what effect this would have on business applications like ERP and CRM. Basically will we all ditch our smart phones in exchange for smart eyeglasses? Do we want a virtual world super-imposed over the real world? Is this the way to really be always connected all the time?

Google made a big splash by introducing their vision with this video. Some of the initial reaction ranged from that this was the greatest thing ever to that now you would have absolutely no privacy since Google would see and hear everything you see and hear. Below is a Google glass fashion shoot.

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Judging by recent patent applications, Microsoft is also working on something similar. Below is a diagram from Microsoft of some of their thinking.

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ERP and CRM

In my world we’ve been battling with moving fairly complicated business application to mobile devices like tablets and phones. We’ve been battling with fitting large amounts of data onto much smaller screens. In a way large flat panel desktop monitors are great for our applications since you can see and manipulate large amounts of data. But sadly everyone wants to do this on their phone, so how do we do that? At this point we are getting a grip on how to do business applications on devices. We are getting a grip on how to handle touch as the input mechanism instead of the keyboard and mouse. We are getting a grip on how to handle the fact that the app isn’t always connected to the network.

Now we hear that smart phones and tablet are just as obsolete as the desktop PC and laptop! So in this world, not only do we have a small screen, but we have to share it with the real world. Plus we have a whole new input model where it’s a combination of voice recognition and eye tracking technology.

glasses3

I don’t think we’ll want to just super-impose our regular Order Entry screen onto the glasses over the real world. I suspect that rather than port our existing ERP and CRM functionality to glasses, more likely we’ll be re-inventing the way we do many business processes. This probably means a proliferation of new apps.

Physical Inventory Counts

One good application I was thinking of was to do physical inventory counts. This is always a painful but necessary process to catch theft and errors. Now you will be able to run your inventory count app in your glasses. As you walk around the warehouse, you just need to look at boxes and have the glasses record the barcode or QR code to count the inventory. For other items, perhaps you can look at something and then double-blink, the software then compares the visual image to all the pictures in the inventory database to find a match and count that item.

Sales Calls

Now you can have a glasses CRM app. Rather than bring up all your customer information on a tablet and keep referring to your tablet, you can see all the information on a customer right before your eyes. The glasses app will bring up the customer for you automatically based on your location and facial recognition software. Then the glasses can present to you all pertinent information on the customer, like his sales history, buying habits or that he’s late paying his bills. This should really impress your clients since it will appear that you care enough about them to know off the top of your head every detail about them. Then further the glasses can have recorded the whole chat, so if there are any disputes later, they can be reviewed.

Pottery Barn

In our nearby Pottery Barn, the items in the store are for display only. If you are interested in something, you need to talk to a salesperson, who looks up the item on their tablet to find out if they have it in stock in the store, in a local warehouse, in a regional warehouse or will need to get it shipped from the manufacturer.  Now there could be a glasses app that identifies the item you are interested in, perhaps by staring at its QR code and double-blinking. Then it can bring up additional catalog information on the item, including delivery logistics and such. Generally this could streamline the whole (painful) process of shopping at Pottery Barn.

Summary

Will the widespread use of such glasses lead to the true surveillance society? Rather than just a plethora of security cameras recording everyone’s movements, will now everything anyone sees and hears through these glasses be recorded and accessible to law enforcement and the government? Or will we manage the privacy concerns and bring in a new generation of connected uses who look on our current phones as archaic as we look back on the original Motorola brick cell phones?

Written by smist08

December 1, 2012 at 7:48 pm

Sage Vision 2012

with one comment

Cambodia

The Sage Vision 2012 conference was held in Siem Reap, Cambodia this year. This conference is for Sage business partners located in Asia. Siem Reap is an UNESCO heritage site for all the various Hindu and Buddhist temples from the Khmer Empire in the 9th to 15th centuries, including the ancient wonder of the world: Angkor Wat.

Modern Cambodia is a terrific place to visit with very friendly people and some really impressive things to see. It’s amazing that Cambodia has progressed as much as it has, since it was really only re-formed as a kingdom in 1993 after suffering so many years of the Vietnam war, Pol Pot and various civil wars. Visiting the war museum was really an eye opening experience to see the suffering that the people endured.

Conference

The majority of our partners in the region are from Singapore, Thailand and Malaysia. But many other countries were represented. Right now we are actually seeing the most growth from Indonesia. This conference focused on the Sage 300 ERP, Sage CRM and Sage ERP X3 products. There were intensive training tracks on each of these. Then there were also general sessions on various aspects of all these products.

The conference started with a keynote address that was introduced by Gee Sing Low, Sage’s General Manager for the regions, followed by Keith Fenner for Sage X3, then Lorcan Malone for Sage CRM then myself for Sage 300 ERP, and then Charles Cheng showing off our revamped partner portal web site. This was then followed by the trade show for ISVs and then a cocktail reception by the pool.

There were then two days of sessions and then wrapped up on the last night with the partner awards gala dinner.

The keynote went well; it was nice that we could weave a story where we cover the ERP market from the lower to higher midmarket with Sage 300 and X3. How we have a number of shared components tying things together like Visual Process Flows, shared connected services as well as linking to a common front office solution with Sage CRM.

ISVs

About a dozen ISVs were at the conference. They had sessions on their products as well as booths in the trade show area. Some of the ISVs present including: Pacific Technology SolutionsTechnisoft, Norming, AutoSimply, Peresoft, XM Development, AcDev and iCube.

Sage provides the core ERP solution and then ISVs provide solutions for various vertical industries. To a large degree an ERP package is a development platform first, and a business application second. We provide the core applications and then ISVs provide specialized solutions for various vertical markets. Generally the success of an ERP package depends both on the strength of the core solution combined with the strength of the ISV community.

Community

I’ve attended many Sage 300/Accpac conferences over the years starting with the series of CA-Worlds in New Orleans. I’ve now attended many South African, Asian, North American and Australian Sage conferences. I’m always struck by the sense of community among all the Business Partners. Many were involved in the original Accpac Plus days. Many have been fierce business rivals for over twenty years, but it always seems like a family reunion at these conferences. Generally a lot of strong friendships and tight bonds have developed over possibly thirty years of working in the Sage 300/Accpac community.

Internet Connectedness

I gave a demonstration of our forthcoming Service Billing connected service running on my iPhone during the keynote presentation. Currently this is an HTML/JavaScript application written with the Argos SDK. At present this has no offline ability, so must be demonstrated while on-line communicating back to a server hosted in Microsoft’s Azure US West Coast data center. In Cambodia, I could rarely get data connectivity with the provider that Roger’s partners with over there, so I had to use the hotel Wi-Fi for the demo. Generally this is a no no, especially at technology conferences where all the attendees are connected to the Wi-Fi as well.

To me, it’s amazing that this demo actually went quite well. It really demonstrated that we do live in a very connected world. I was easily entering service tickets into my ERP while on the road ten thousand miles away in Cambodia. If things work here, I tend to think they really should work anywhere.

Summary

Sage Vision 2012 was another fun and informative conference. I have lots of feedback to bring back home. I visited many interesting sites around Siem Reap. I accumulated many air miles. I find all these conferences are always a worthwhile endeavor.