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Posts Tagged ‘kendo ui

Adding a Grid to Your Sage 300 Web UI

with one comment

Introduction

The grid or table control is a key element for data entry in any Accounting application. With Sage 300 we use the grid control to enter things like Order or Invoice details. Interactions with a grid control tend to be quite complex. The data has to be managed so it is loaded only a page at a time (often called virtual scrolling), since there could be thousands of detail lines and loading them all at once would be quite slow. There is the ability to edit, delete and add lines. Tabbing has to be handled well to enhance data entry. People also have the ability to re-arrange the grid columns, hide columns and then expect these changes to be remembered.

icreceipts

This blog article will talk about the key elements to adding a grid control to your Sage 300 Web UI and what sort of support you need in your UI to support all the desired functionality. A fair bit is handled for you in the Sage 300 Web UI Framework, however you have to handle various events and there is a lot of power to add your own programming.

Configuration

There is a lot of support for standard grid operations in the Sage 300 Web UI framework. Much of this is controlled by a config JSON object which is passed to our @Html.KoKendoGrid function that defines the grid in the Razor View. This file defines a number of properties of the grid along with a number of standard callout functions you can define to add your custom processing. The good news is we have a utility to generate much of this from the ASP.Net MVC Model.

JavaScript Generation Utility

To generate this code we provide a utility which will generate the Razor View code and a lot of the standard JavaScript code that you need. So for instance the code for the Razor View might be:

jsgen1

And then some of the JavaScript code for the config object might be:

jsgen2

Server Side Pagination

In our VB UIs, we had virtual scrolling in our grids, which would basically bring in a page or two at a time. It supported scrolling one page ahead or one page back, go to the top or bottom but you couldn’t go to an arbitrary point in the file without searching (in fact the scroll bar would always be at the top, bottom or right in the middle). In the Web UIs we use the Kendo UI Grid control and try to keep the scrolling mechanism standard for the Web, which means the control tells you how many pages there are and lets you go to any page you like as well as going to the next or previous one.

We provide a lot of the support for doing this in our business repository base classes which expose a get method which takes the page number, page size, filter and order as parameters. Then as long as you match and set the configuration data in the grid’s JavaScript config JSON object, you get the pagination support. There are a couple of things to keep in mind, one is that we rely on our filterCount API call, which translates directly to a SQL statement, which means it can only count based on database fields and not calculated fields, so you can’t restrict the records in your grid based on any calculated fields or the count will be wrong (if you really need this then you need to disable the ability to go to a specific page). You also need to have a hidden SerialNumber column in the grid which contains the record number.

ViewListControl vs AccpacGrid

In our VB UIs, we actually had two grid controls. One was the ViewListControl which would show a separate View record in each line and supported virtual scrolling. Then we had the AccpacGrid control which would usually show an array of fields from a single record (like tax information, or perhaps item structure information).

In the Web UIs we only have one Grid control. It naturally works more like VB’s ViewListControl. So how do we handle the other case of the AccpacGrid? We do this in our controller by translating the array of fields into what looks like a list of details. This way to the Grid control, it doesn’t really see a difference. Usually you don’t need to enable virtual scrolling in this case since there is typically 5 or 10 records and you just provide them all at once. So typically your ViewModel will have a list of records which the controller will populate and then this is set as the Grid’s data source.

Editing

Like VB, the intent of editing cells is to place the correct edit control over the grid cell to perform the edit. There is a lot of framework support for this as well as lots of callouts for you to do your own custom processing. The same is true for adding a new line and deleting a set of lines (note that the Web UI grid supports multiple selection). Also note that the add line, delete line, edit columns buttons aren’t part of the Grid, these are separate buttons styled to look like part of the grid in a region just above the Grid. This means you can easily add your own buttons and controls to this area if you wish.

Saving Preferences

We have API support to help with loading and saving grid column preferences. In VB these are stored in the *_p.ism files, in the Web UIs these are stored in the SQL database in the new USRPROP table. So emptying USRPROP is the Web UI equivalent of deleting the *_p.ism files. Generally, we want to move everything into the database and remove our reliance on the shared data folder over time.

Summary

This article was just a quick introduction to adding a Grid control to a Web UI. Similar to the VB UIs, the grid control is potentially quite complicated as it supports a lot of diverse functionality. But, if you are doing fairly standard functionality, look for a lot of support in the Web UI framework to help you get the job done.

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Written by smist08

February 3, 2016 at 6:29 pm

Skills for Developing for Sage 300c

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Introduction

With the Web UIs in Sage 300c rolling out in a couple of weeks, there is a lot of interest in the SDK and how to develop for this platform. We are still putting together the SDK, but in the meantime you can learn the technologies that are involved in developing our new Web UIs. Generally we’ve used off the shelf components both commercial and open source to develop our new UI framework. The good thing about this is that there are lots of resources available to learn the various technologies involved, including books, web sites, samples, videos, courses, etc.

cna2arch

We’ve generally tried to use all these tools in very standard ways. For instance we don’t add large amount of code to custom controls to change their behavior, we’ve kept it standard and only changed their appearance using CSS. We use the ASP.Net MVC framework in a natural way, so what you learn from the various standard resources is all applicable.

Due to the nature of programming, you can often do quite a few creative things. There is nothing to stop you using other libraries or tools than mentioned here. However one of the points of listing these is to let you know which we use, which means if you ask DPP support, these are the tools and libraries that we know about and can help answer questions about. You are welcome to use other tools, but we may not be able to provide much help on them.

Languages

C#: All server side programming above the Sage 300 .Net API is written in C#. This is a very powerful object oriented extension to C which is quite similar to Java. It has an extensive standard class library. The tools and environments that support C# are really powerful and productive.

JavaScript: All client/browser programming is in JavaScript. We support newer browsers which all now support fairly standard implementations. The main pitfall of JavaScript is that it’s an interpreted language that will process almost anything, often with surprising results.

Framework

ASP.Net MVC: Do not confuse this with ASP.Net (no MVC). This is a completely different framework which is much more powerful and gives a really solid framework for web development.

Web

HTML: HTML controls the general layout of web pages in the browser, however it isn’t as important as it used to be. Our HTML is generated from Microsoft Razor Views, so a good portion of the HTML is actually represented as C# code. Then layout is largely controlled by CSS and not by HTML elements.

CSS: Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) control the layout and look of all the elements on the HTML page. We provide a global stylesheet which has most of what you need. However many screens need to define custom elements for their own fine grained control. We will provide a style catalog and samples of all the main UI elements.

Tools

Visual Studio 2013: This is the main IDE where we develop and debug our code. This is a very powerful and productive environment to write, build and debug code. Chances are we will be on to VS 2015 by the time the SDK ships, but for now this is what we developed our 2016 release in. We use the premium edition because that is what comes with our particular MSDN subscription, but any edition will probably be fine.

ReSharper: This is an optional tool that we’ve licensed for all our developers. We’ve found it very helpful to improve the quality of our code and to help with refactoring.

GitHub: Although using a source code control system is optional, you should be using one. Using any of Git, Subversion, TFS, etc. is fine, but you should really be using one. We use GitHub because it is very fast and reliable. The real benefit is that it’s fast for everyone when you have large internationally dispersed teams.

TeamCity: This is another optional component. You can just build out of Visual Studio. We use TeamCity, but you can also use other automated build systems like Jenkins. Its generally a good practice to have a continuous build/integration system that is always building things as they are developed, deploying them and running automated tests to ensure that things aren’t broken.

Libraries

Kendo UI: This is the library of UI widgets that we use like the editable grid and date control. When we started this project this was strictly a commercial product. However half way through they created the open source Kendo UI Core which has all the controls we use for creating Accounting Screens except the editable grid control. For the grid control and the graphical controls in the KPIs,  you will need to purchase a license for the professional edition.

KnockoutJS: We use knockout for data binding between the UI controls and the MVC models. When we started the project the data binding in Kendo UI didn’t meet our needs so we evaluated alternatives. We found knockout and it did everything we needed so we’ve continued to use it. In the meantime Kendo has improved and AngularJS has become popular, but we’ve stuck with Knockout (which is popular again).

JQuery: Most modern web apps use JQuery. Although its main use of insulating people from browser differences isn’t as important and most browsers have natively implemented its main features, it is still an important library and we use it extensively.

.Net Framework 4.5.1: Since all our server components are written in C# and using the ASP.Net MVC framework, of course we are using the .Net framework. For the 2016 release we are at version 4.5.1. However by the time the SDK ships this will probably be at a higher version.

Sage 300 .Net API: To integrate to the standard Sage 300 Business Logic, we use Sage 300’s .Net API. So when writing code in the MVC models to perform Sage 300 processing, you are writing code to this API.

Crystal Web Viewer: We provide a complete framework for handling Crystal Reports, so you don’t need to directly interact with Crystal. We generate reports using the same code as the desktop version, but then display the result in Crystal’s HTML viewer rather than the ActiveX one.

Unity: This is a library for doing dependency injection in .Net. You probably don’t need to use this directly, but it’s useful to understand how your DLLs are being loaded and why the startup process works like it does.

Summary

This was a quick list of the various tools and technologies we used to create our new Web UIs. Hopefully it gives you a starting point of things to start learning about, if you are interested in Sage 300c development.

Written by smist08

September 19, 2015 at 4:33 pm