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Kali Linux on the Raspberry Pi

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Introduction

Raspbian is the main operating system for the Raspberry Pi, but there are quite a few alternatives. Raspbian is based on Debian Linux and there has been a good uptake on the Raspberry Pi which means that most Linux applications have ARM compiled packages available through the Debian APT package manager. As a consequence it’s quite easy to create a Raspberry Pi Linux distribution, so there are quite a few of them. Kali Linux is a specialist distribution that is oriented to hackers (both black and white hat). It comes with a large number of hacking tools for gaining access to networks, compromising computers, spying on communications and other fun things. One cool thing is that Kali Linux has a stripped down version for the Raspberry Pi that is oriented towards a number of specialized purposes. However with the apt-get package manager you can add pretty well anything that has been left out.

If you watch the TV show Mr. Robot (highly recommended) then you might notice that all the cool in-the-know people are running Kali Linux. If you want to get a taste of what it’s all about and you have a Raspberry Pi then all you need is a free micro-SD card to give it a try.

Are You a Black or White Hat?

If you are a black hat hacker looking to infiltrate or damage another computer system, then you probably aren’t reading this blog. Instead you are somewhere on the darknet reading much more malicious articles than this one. This article is oriented more to white hat hackers or to system administrators looking to secure their computing resources. The reason it’s important for system administrators to know about this stuff is that they need to know what they are really protecting against. Hackers are very clever and are always coming up with new hacks and techniques. So it’s important for the good guys to know a bit about how hackers think and to have defenses and protections against the imaginative attacks that might come their way. This now includes the things the bad guys might try to do with a Raspberry Pi.

Anyone that is responsible for securing a network or computer has to test their security and certainly one easy way to get started is to hit it with all the exploit tools included with Kali Linux.

Why Kali on the Pi?

A lot of hacking tasks like cracking WiFi passwords take a lot of processing power. Cracking WPA2 passwords is usually done on very powerful computers with multiple GPU cards and very large dictionary databases. Accomplishing this on a Raspberry Pi would pretty much take forever if it could actually do it. Many hacking tasks are of this nature, very compute intensive.

The Raspberry Pi is useful due to its low cost and small size. The low cost makes it disposable, if you lose it then it doesn’t matter so much and the small size means you can hide it easily. So for instance one use would be to hide a Raspberry Pi at the site you are trying to hack. Then the Raspberry Pi can monitor the Wifi traffic looking for useful data packets that can give away information. Or even leave the Pi somewhere hidden connected to a hardwired ethernet connection. Then Kali Linux has tools to get this information to external sources in a secretive way and allows you to remotely control it to direct various attacks.

Many companies build their security like eggs with a hard to penetrate shell and often locating a device on their premises can bypass their main security protections. You can then run repeated metasploit attacks looking for weaknesses from the inside. Remember your security should be more like an onion with multiple nested layers, so getting through one doesn’t give an attacker access to everything.

Installing Kali Linux

The Kali Linux web site includes a complete disk image of the Raspberry Pi version. You just need to burn this to a micro-SD card using a tool like ApplePi Baker. They you just put the micro-SD in your Raspberry Pi, turn it on and off you go. However there are a few necessary steps to take before you really start:

  1. The root password is toor, so change this first time you boot up.
  2. The Kali Linux instructions point out you need to refresh your SSH certificates since otherwise you get the ones included with the image. The download page has instructions on how to do this.
  3. The image is configured for 8Gig so if you have a larger SD card then you need to repartition it to get all the free space. I used the GParted program for this which I got via “apt-get install gparted”. Note that to use apt-get you need to connect to WiFi or the Internet. Another option is to get Raspbian’s configuration program and use that, it works with most variants of Debian Linux and allows you to do some other things like setup overclocking. You can Google for the wget command to get this.
  4. Update the various installed programs via “apt-get update” and “apt-get upgrade”. (If you aren’t still logged on as root you need to sudo these).

Now you are pretty much ready to play. Notice that you are in a nice graphical environment and that the application menu is full of hacking tools. These aren’t as many hacking tools as the full Kali distribution, but these are all ones that work well on the Raspberry Pi. They als limited the number so you can run off a really cheap 8 Gig micro-SD card.

I see people say you should stick to command line versions of the tools on the Pi due to its processing power and limited memory, but I found I could add the GUI versions and these worked fine. For instance the nmap tool is installed, but the zenmap graphical front end isn’t. Adding zenmap is easy via “apt-get install zenmap” and then this seems to work fine. I think the assumption is that most people will use the Raspberry version of Kali headless (meaning no screen or keyboard) so it needs to be accessed via remote control software like secure shell which means you want to avoid GUIs.

Summary

Installing Kali Linux on a micro-SD card for your Raspberry Pi si a great way to learn about the various tools that hackers can easily use to try and penetrate, spy on or interfere with people’s computers. There are quite a few books on this as well as many great resources on the Web. Kali’s website is a great starting point. Anyway I find it quite eye opening the variety of readily tools and how easy it is for anyone to use them.

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Written by smist08

January 16, 2018 at 3:01 am