Stephen Smith's Blog

Musings on Machine Learning…

Raspberry Pi 4 First Impressions

leave a comment »


Introduction

I’ve received my Raspberry Pi 4B with 4GB or RAM a few weeks ago. I’ve been using it to write my forthcoming book on Raspberry Pi Assembly Language Programming, so I thought I’d give a few of my first impressions. The biggest change for the Raspberry Pi 4 is the support for three memory sizes, 1GB, 2GB and 4GB. This overcomes the biggest complaint against the Raspberry Pi 3, that it bogs down too quickly as you run browser tabs and multiple windows.

Some of the other hardware improvements are:

  • Dual 4K monitor support with dual micro-HDMI ports.
  • Two of the four USB ports are USB-3.
  • The ethernet is now gigabit and the WiFi is faster.
  • A 1.5GHz quad-core 64-bit ARM Cortex-A72 CPU.
  • The SDRAM is now LPDDR4.
  • The GPU is upgraded to Broadcom’s VideoCore VI.
  • Hardware HEVC video support for 4Kp60 video.

On paper, this makes the Raspberry Pi 4 appear far superior to its predecessors, In this article, I’ll discuss what is much better and a few of the drawbacks. This release will squash a lot of the compatible Pi competitors, but I’ll compare it to my NVidia Jetson Nano and mention a few places where these products still surpass the Pi.

Raspbian Buster

At the same time the Raspberry Pi Foundation released the Raspberry Pi 4, they also released the new “Buster” version of Raspbian, the Debian Linux derived operating system tailored specifically to the Raspberry Pi. On the day this was announced, I ordered my Raspberry Pi 4, then went and downloaded the new Buster release, then installed it on my Raspberry Pi 3B.

If you have a Raspberry Pi 4, then you must run the Buster release as older versions of Raspbian don’t have support for the newer hardware. If you are running an older Pi then you can keep running the older version or upgrade as you like.

Is it 64-Bits?

The first rumour that was squashed was that Raspbian would move to 64-bits. This didn’t happen. Raspbian is a 32-bit operating system. The Raspberry Pi Foundation says it will stay this way for the foreseeable future. The first reason is that the Raspberry Pi 1 and Raspberry Pi Zero use a much older ARM processor that doesn’t support 64-bits. The Raspberry Pi Foundation still supports and sells these models and they are quite popular due to their low price. They don’t want to support two operating systems, so they stick to one 32-bit version that will run on every Raspberry Pi ever made. Perhaps other hardware vendors should look at this level of support for older models.

Even though 32-bit implies a 32-bit virtual address space for processes, which limits an individual process to 4GB of memory, the ARM SoC used in the Pi has memory access hardware for 48-bit addresses. This allows the operating system to give each process a different 4GB address space, so if Raspberry Pi models with more than 4GB of memory are released, Raspbian can utilize this memory.

Another problem with going to 64-bits is that all the previous Raspberry Pi models, and one version of the Raspberry Pi 4 only have 1GB of RAM. This isn’t sufficient to run a 64-bit operating system. You can do it, but the operating system takes all the RAM, and once you run a program or two, everything bogs down. This is due to all addresses and most integers becoming 64-bits, and hence twice as large. A definite nice feature of Raspbian is that it can run effectively in only 1GB or memory.

Based on Debian Buster

Raspbian is notorious for lagging behind the mainstream releases of Linux. The benefit of this is that Raspbian has always been very stable and reliable. It works well and avoids the problems that happen at the bleeding edge. The downside is that it can contain security vulnerabilities or bugs that are fixed in the newer versions.

With Buster, Raspbian released its version ahead of Debian releasing the main version. Linus Torvalds himself was involved in moving the Pi up to a newer version of the Linux kernel. His concern is that as other hardware platforms adopt proprietary software like UEFI firmware, with government mandated backdoors, that the benefits of open source are being lost. The Raspberry Pi, including its firmware are all open source and there is a feeling in the open source community that this is the future to fight for.

Some Software Not Ported Yet

As a result of the move to Buster, some software that Raspberry users are accustomed to is missing. The most notable case is Mathematica. A port of this is underway and it is promised to be included in a future upgrade.

I had problems with CubicSDR, a Software Defined Radio (SDR) program. It could detect my SDR USB device, but didn’t run properly, just displaying a blank screen when receiving.

Heat Dissipation

The Raspberry Pi 4 uses more power than previous models. It requires a USB-C power adapter which means you can’t use a power adapter from previous models. I bought my Pi 4 from buyapi.ca and got the bundle with a case, power adapter, heat sinks and micro-HDMI cable. I needed the cables. The case is their Raspberry Pi 3 case, with the holes for the cables moved for the slightly different Pi 4 configuration. The case lacked any ventilation holes and the Pi would throttle due to overheating fairly easily. My solution was to run it with the top of the case removed. This seems to provide enough air circulation that I haven’t seen any overheating since.

Some people claim the Raspberry Pi 4 requires a fan for cooling, but that hasn’t been my experience. I think the cases need properly thought out ventilation and that is all that is needed. I think a bigger heatsink like the one included with the NVidia Jetson Nano would be warranted as well. I don’t like fans and consider the quietness of the Pi as one of its biggest features.

Cons

All this sounds great, but what are the downsides of the Raspberry Pi 4?

All New Cables

I purchased an NVidia Jetson Nano and to run it, I just unplugged the cables from my Raspberry Pi 3 and plugged them into the Jetson and away it went. Not new cables required.

The Raspberry Pi required a new USB-C power supply and a lot has been made of how you can’t use Apple laptop power supplies, but I think the real issue is you can’t use an older Pi power supply, even if it can provide sufficient power.

To support dual monitors, the Pi went to micro-HDMI ports to fit both connectors. This means you need either new cables or at least micro- to regular-HDMI adapters. The NVidia Jetson supports dual monitors but annoyingly with two different cables, HDMI and a DisplayPort cable. At least the cables are the same for the two video ports.

Otherwise all my USB devices that I was using with the Raspberry Pi 3 seem to work with the Pi 4.

SDCard Bottleneck

They have improved the data transfer speed to and from the microSD card with the Pi 4, but this is still a bottleneck. I would have loved it if they had added a M.2 SSD interface to the board. You can improve on the microSD card speed by using a USB 3 external SSD. The problem is that you can’t boot from this USB 3 drive. You can copy the root filesystem over to the drive and run mostly from the USB and although I haven’t tried it yet, people report this is an improvement.

Raspberry Pi promote the 4 as a desktop computer replacement and it definitely has the processing power. However, I don’t think this really holds up without something better than running off a microSD card. The Raspberry Pi Foundation say they will add boot from USB support in a future firmware update, but it isn’t there yet. Although the speed of USB 3 is better than the microSD interface, it still isn’t nearly as good as you can obtain with M.2 and a good new SSD.

No 64-Bits Yet

The Raspberry Pi Foundation, caught everyone by surprise with their release. This included the people that maintain alternate operating systems for the Raspberry Pi. There is a good Ubuntu Mate 64-bit version that runs on the Raspberry Pi 3. It is slow and you can’t run many programs, but it does work and you can experiment with things like ARM 64-bit Assembly programming.

The person that maintains this had to order his Raspberry Pi 4, like everyone else and hasn’t produced a Pi 4 version yet. It would have been nice if the Raspberry Pi Foundation had seeded some early models to the people that develop alternate operating systems for the Pi.

As of this writing, Raspbian is the only operating system that runs on the Raspberry Pi, but hopefully the others won’t take too long to modify what they need to.

The Raspberry Pi 4 with 4GB is the first Raspberry Pi that has the power to run a true 64-bit operating system, so it would be nice to play with.

Cost

The Raspberry Pi 4 is still dirt cheap, $35 for the 1GB model and $55 for the 4Gig model. This upgrade is a bit more expensive since you need a new power adapter, new video cables and a new case as well. I think the extra $20 for the extra memory is well worth it.

Compared to the NVidia Jetson Nano

The Raspberry Pi 4 blows most of the current crop of Pi clones out of the water. One exception is the NVidia Jetson Nano. This single board computer has 4GB of memory and runs full 64-bit Ubuntu Linux and as a consequence feels more powerful than the Pi 4.

The Pi 4 has a more powerful ARM CPU, but the Jetson has 4 USB-C ports and a 128 core CUDA GPU. The CUDA GPU is used by software like CubicSDR for DSP like processing, along with most AI toolkits like Tensorflow.

The NVidia Jetson costs $99, so is nearly twice as expensive as a Pi 4. However if you want to experiment with AI, the 128-core CUDA GPU is an excellent entry level system. 

Summary

I got used to the Raspberry Pi 4 fairly quickly and after a couple of weeks thought it was pretty similar to the Raspberry Pi 3. I then needed to do something on my Raspberry 3 and booted it up. After using the Pi 4, going back to the Pi 3, felt like I was working in molasses, everything was so slow. This is a real testament to how good the new Pi is, especially with 4GB of memory.

Yes, there are some teething problems with the new model, as there often is at the bleeding edge. But overall the Raspberry Pi 4 is a solid upgrade, and once you adopt it, you really can’t go back. 

 

Advertisements

Written by smist08

August 2, 2019 at 7:09 pm

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: