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Sage 300 Web UI SDK – Adding JavaScript

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Last week we talked about adding UI controls to our Web UI project. In the early days of the Web, this would be all you needed to do. The user would just enter the data and hit save (or submit). However modern Web applications are expected to be more responsive and interactive. This is achieved by adding JavaScript code which can perform local processing or make calls to the server for additional data or to perform additional actions. Most modern Web applications contain quite a bit of JavaScript and achieve quite a high degree of user interaction.


In our source code for the new Web UIs, it turns out that 80% of the application code is C# and 20% is JavaScript. Although it is only 20%, this is still a lot of code and care needs to be taken with it. Some programmers really love JavaScript, some really hate it. JavaScript is more of a free form interpreted language that is very forgiving. This allows a lot more freedom in how you structure your programs. Debugging and writing JavaScript is quick and easy since there is no big build/compile step. On the other hand if you capitalize or spell something wrong, there is no compiler to catch the mistake and debugging these errors can be quite frustrating.

We use JQuery to isolate ourselves from Browser differences, for the most part with newer versions of all the Browsers the differences in dialects of JavaScript is much smaller than it used to be. But it still has to be taken into account. Usually the differences manifest themselves in error handling and security concerns. Sometimes one Browser might ignore an error and keep on going whereas another Browser will throw an exception. Similarly, as some practices that lead to security problems are tightened, the implementation can be a bit uneven across the Browsers. Fortunately, most of our application programming doesn’t hit these cases, but it does highlight one the importance of testing in all the supported Browsers.

Another good thing about JavaScript is that tools have all gotten better. You can debug your code in Visual Studio while it runs in Internet Explorer quite seamlessly with debugging you C# code. Further the other Browser all have great debugging tools that can really help. A lot of times you can get several views on something to see what is going wrong. Plus there are compilers for JavaScript to help find some common typos and to enforce programming standards you might want to adopt.


We provide a global framework for doing things like popping up Finders. We also have lots of routines to handle our standard data like dates and numbers. We use a number of open source libraries like JQuery and Knockout.js as well as the (partly commercial) Kendo UI library. Generally, if you know our framework, you don’t need to know that much from the other libraries, but as you get more sophisticated, you will want to leverage them as well. There is also nothing stopping you including further libraries, just that we won’t be able to support you in their use.

Server Independent

We don’t use any libraries with matching client and server components. Hence all communications are handled by our JavaScript code, which means we have full control over all communications. This means it’s our responsibility to not be chatty. It also means we write all the code to handle any Ajax calls from the Browser. ASP.Net MVC makes this pretty easy. It also means that if you want to add your own components (say another UI control) then you can do so as long as you follow this same basic approach.

Example Code

The Web UI code generation wizard creates three JavaScript files for each UI. These are:

  1. screennameKoExtn.js – This is an extension to the knockout data binding where you can add some JavaScript generated calculated fields to the model.
  2. screennameRepository.js – This file contains a method for each RPC call that can be made. We start with the basic CRUD operations, but you would add your screen specific ones here.
  3. screennameBehaviour.js – This is all the other JavaScript code. You may want to break this file up for larger UIs. But for smaller UIs this is a handy place to contain all the JavaScript for working with the controls on your form.

The Behaviour.js file contains a large object for the screen with functions to bind controls to methods and to do various processing when that control is activated. For instance, for our sample PJC CostType UI, in the init routine it will call initButtons which will bind all the buttons to code including the Save button:

       // Save Button
       $("#btnSave").bind('click', function () {

Then the saveCostType routine is:

saveCostType: function () {
     if ($("#frmCostType").valid()) {
         var data = sg.utls.ko.toJS(modelData, costTypeUI.computedProperties);
         if (modelData.UIMode() === sg.utls.OperationMode.SAVE) {
              costTypeRepository.update(data, costTypeUISuccess.update);
         } else {
         costTypeRepository.add(data, costTypeUISuccess.update);

The costTypeRepository.update routine is in the Repository.js file and performs the Ajax call to do the save:

       // Update
       update: function(data, callbackMethod) {
    "Save", data, callbackMethod);

This routine will actually transmit the data model to the server where it is picked up by a controller and processed. We talk about the server side of things in a later article. The entire file is a bit on the long side to include in the blog, but hopefully this give a bit of flavour of what it contains.

The dataModel.UIMode is a predefined calculated field in the screennameKoExtn.js file and keeps track of whether the UI is in Add or Save mode.


This was a quick glimpse of the JavaScript that is always running behind the scenes in our new Sage 300 Web UIs. Once we cover the server side, we’ll have to consider a lot of cases that go from the HTML to the JavaScript to the C# to the Sage 300 Business Logic to the SQL database and then all the way back. This is just the second step on this journey after last week’s article.


Written by smist08

December 12, 2015 at 8:22 pm

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