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All things Sage 300…


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Sage ERP Online Services (SEOS) was a system developed alongside the online/cloud versions of Sage 200 ERP (UK) and Sage Morano ERP (Spain). The purpose of this was to provide a number of common sets of functionalities for all Sage online applications such as creating new tenants and users, managing audit logs, managing cloud credentials and managing cloud resources. The system also handled common functions such as integration to the various Sage billing systems. Although SEOS was originally developed as part of the Sage 200 and Sage Morano online projects, it was always intended to be a general tool used by all Sage cloud products. SEOS has been in successful production with both Sage 200 and Sage Morano for some time now, it is now being adopted by various other Sage cloud products both in Europe and in North America.

A lot of what SEOS does is behind the scenes and customers and partners generally don’t see it as a separate service. But I thought it might be of interest to people to know what is or will be going on behind the scenes in our various cloud products. This article is just talking about SEOS in general and doesn’t make any claims as to which will be the next product to adopt SEOS or any timelines for such adoption. But for people using Sage 200 or Sage Morano, they probably already have some experience using the SEOS portal.

One of the key goals of SEOS is to automate everything so there are no manual processes in creating new tenants or users, but additionally it orchestrates disaster recovery, backup/restore and the auto-scaling of resources.

SEOS Services

SEOS has a number of different ways to interact with it. There is a web portal for DevOps/IS type people who run the system, there is a web portal for customers and partners and then there are a number of APIs for the various ERPs to communicate with. Some of the main components are shown below.


The main job an ERP has to do to integrate to SEOS is provide a provisioning engine. This engine runs all the time (actually at least two of them for high availability). This engine checks the SEOS job queue to see if it has anything to do. Tasks it might be asked to perform include creating a new tenant, creating a new user or suspending a tenant.

Bootstrapping the System

To create a new cloud instance of an ERP that is integrated with SEOS just requires the provisioning engine running. This is either setup manually or via some PowerShell scripts. Once the provisioning engine is going, everything else is done in the provisioning engine as it gets messages from SEOS. When it gets its first create tenant message, it will see that no application servers are running and create a couple (for high availability), it will create the database and do anything else that is needed for that tenant to be able to operate. For the first tenant that could mean creating quite a few storage, database, VM or other resources.

Then as tenants are added, the provisioning engine will be monitoring (with the help of SEOS) the usage of the system and will start additional resources (like application servers), if it determines that the system needs to scale to handle the additional load.

Thus nearly all the work of creating a large cloud system, possibly consisting of hundreds of VMs will all be brought about automatically via the SEOS/provisioning engine system.

This then helps with disaster recover, since when SEOS switches to the alternate data center, it handles switching the databases and basically bootstraps the whole process the same way. Note that databases are a bit different since they are already being replicated to the alternate site and you just want to switch the backup to primary and then use that.


When the provisioning engine requires a new resource like an Azure SQL database or a new Web Role (VM), it doesn’t just go to the cloud API to get it (say using the Azure SDK). Instead it asks SEOS for the resource and SEOS creates it for the ERP. This way the ERP isn’t using the native cloud API, instead it just uses the SEOS API. This then opens up the possibility for hosting these cloud ERPs in different clouds.

Currently all the SMB ERPs are hosted in the Microsoft Azure cloud because we get very good pricing on this and it meets our needs extremely well. However we don’t want to put all our eggs in one basket and if conditions change dramatically, we can much more easily switch other providers. There are other reasons we may need to do this, for instance Azure doesn’t have a data center in Africa and we have a lot of customers in Africa, so we may need a provider closer than Singapore.


DevOps is the group that runs all the various Sage Cloud offerings (its official name varies from region to region, but the idea is the same). Having DevOps manage dozens of cloud products all working different ways with different maintenance procedures would be a huge challenge. SEOS brings all these aspects together into one set of procedures.

Take logging for example. It’s easy for any application to generate huge log files for diagnostic and auditing purposes. There are lots of good APIs for doing this. But managing these logs is a challenge. The logs need to be archived for future reference. Generally there are several types of logs, like the Windows Event Log, and application diagnostic log and an application security log. All these need to be kept in a central spot including backing them up. There has to be easy ways to search them, say by tenant, event type or date time. Many people use Elastic Search to search their logs. SEOS provides a uniform way for managing these and automates most of the process. This way DevOps only needs to know one way of managing logs and not a separate way for each ERP. Plus SEOS automates the whole process, avoiding manual procedures and mistakes.

Billing Engines

Sage is a large company and operates around the world. Most of our products are charged for and the backend systems that do billing vary around the world. Various geographic regions have extra regulatory requirements and different business rules. SEOS handles providing usage data to the billing engine via a standard adapter. Each region has to write an adapter to interface to SEOS. Removing this burden of interfacing to the Sage billing systems is a huge benefit to the ERP teams who really don’t want to have to deal with these details.


If you are a partner or customer using Sage SMB Cloud offerings in Europe, then you have probably already seen SEOS and know something about it. If you are using Sage SMB Cloud offerings in other parts of the world, then you will probably start to see SEOS appearing over the next while. These will probably appear more as features or services, but these are being brought to you by the SEOS global initiative.

Written by smist08

August 9, 2014 at 3:34 pm

2 Responses

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  1. […] Introduction Sage ERP Online Services (SEOS) was a system developed alongside the online/cloud versions of Sage 200 ERP (UK) and Sage Morano ERP (Spain). The purpose of this was to provide a number…  […]

  2. Stephen was there any Sage 300 ERP specific news coming out of Summit 2014?


    August 9, 2014 at 4:45 pm

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