Stephen Smith's Blog

All things Sage 300…

The Times They Are a-Changin’

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Right now we have our nephew Ian living with us as he takes a Lighthouse Labs developer boot camp program in Ruby on Rails and Web Programming. This is a very intense course that has 8 weeks instruction and then a guaranteed internship of at least 4 weeks with a sponsoring company. A lot of this is an immersion in the current high tech culture that has developed in downtown Vancouver. This corresponds with myself working to expand the Sage 300 ERP development team in Richmond and our hiring efforts over the past several months. This article is then based on a few observations and experiences around these two happenings.

Sage 300 ERP has been around for over thirty years now and this has caused us to have quite a few generations of programmers all working on the product. Certainly over this time the various theories of what a high tech office should look like and what a talented programmer wants in a company has changed quite dramatically. As Sage moves forwards we need to change with the times and adopt a lot of these new ways of doing things and accommodate these new preferred lifestyles.

Generally people go through three phases of their career, starting single, no kids, renting to transitioning to married, home ownership and eventually kids to kids leaving home and considering retiring. Of course these days there can be some major career changes along the way as industries are disrupted and people need to retrain and reeducate themselves. Every office needs a good mix, to build a diverse, energetic and innovative culture, which has experience but is still willing to take risks.

Offices or No Offices

When I started with Accpac at Computer Associates, we were largely a cube farm perhaps not to dis-similar to the picture below.


The ambition was to have as much privacy as possible which usually translated to high cube walls, other barriers and the ambition to one day move into an office. At the time Microsoft advertised that on their campus every employee got an office, so they could concentrate and think to be more effective at their work. I visited the Excel team at this time and they had two buildings packed with lots of very small offices which led to long narrow claustrophobic hallways.

A lot has changed since then. Software development has much more adopted the Scrum/Agile model where people work together as a team and social interactions are very important. Further as products move to the cloud, the developers need to team up with DevOps and all sorts of other people that are crucial for their product’s success.

Now most firms adopt more open office approach. There are no permanent offices, everyone works together as a team.


There is a lot of debate about which is better. People used to more privacy of offices and cubes are loathe to lose that. People that have been using the open office approach can’t imagine moving back to cubes. Also with more people working a percentage of their time from home, a permanent spot at the offices doesn’t always make sense.

Downtown versus the Suburbs

When I started with CA the office was located in town near Granville Island. This was a great location, central, many good restaurants, and easily accessible via transit. Then we moved out to Richmond to a sprawling high tech park like many of the similar companies in the 90s. These were all sprawling landscapes of three story office buildings each one with a giant parking lot surrounding it. All very similar whether in Richmond, Irvine, Santa Clara or elsewhere.

Now the trend is reversing and people are moving back to downtown. Most new companies are located in or near downtown and several large companies have setup major development centers in town recently. Now the high tech parks in the suburbs are starting to have quite a few vacancies.

The Younger Generation

A lot of this is being driven by the twenty-something generation. What they look for in a company is quite different today than what I looked for when I started out. There are quite a few demographic changes as well as lifestyle changes that are driving this. A few key driving factors are:

  • The number of young people getting drivers licenses and buying cars is shrinking. There are a lot of reasons for this. But people who can’t drive have trouble getting to the suburbs.
  • People are having children later in life. Often putting it off until their late thirties or even forties.
  • City cores are being re-vitalized. Even Calgary and Edmonton are trying to get urban sprawl under control.
  • Real estate in the desirable high tech centers like San Francisco, Seattle or Vancouver is extremely expensive. Loft apartments downtown are often the way to go.
  • Much more work is done at home and if coffee shops.

This all makes living and working downtown much more preferable. It is also leading to people requiring less space and looking for more social interactions.

Hiring that Younger Generation

To remain competitive a company like Sage needs to be able to hire younger people just finishing their education. We need the infusion of youth, energy and new ideas. If a company doesn’t get this then it will die. Right now the hiring market is very competitive. There is a lot of venture capital investment creating hot new companies, many existing companies are experiencing good growth and generally the percentage of the economy driven by high tech is growing. Another problem is that industries like construction, mining and oil are booming, often hiring people at very high wages before they even think about post-secondary education.

What we are finding is that many young people don’t have cars, live downtown and are looking to work in a cool open office concept building.

We are in the process of converting our offices to a more modern open office environment. We do allow people to work at home some days. Maybe we will even be able to move back downtown once the current lease expires? Or maybe we will need to create a satellite office downtown.

Generally we have to become more involved with both the educational institutions by hiring co-op students and other interns. We need to participate in more activities of the local developer and educational community like the HTML500. We need to ensure that Sage is known to the students and that they consider it a good career path to embark on. Often hiring co-op students now can lead to regular full time employees later.

Since Sage has been around for a long time and has a large solid customer base, we offer a stable work environment. You know you will receive your next pay check. Many startups run out of funding or otherwise go broke. Often while the job market is hot, young people don’t worry about this too much, but as you get into a mortgage, this can become more important.


The times are changing and not only do our developers need to keep retraining and learning how to do things differently, but so do our facilities departments, IS departments and HR departments. Change is often scary, but it is also exciting and stops life from becoming boring.

Personally, I would much rather work downtown (I already live there). I think I will be sad when I give up my office, but at the same time I don’t want to become the stereotypical old person yelling at the teenagers to get off my lawn. Overall I think I will prefer a more mobile way of working, not so tied to my particular current office.


Written by smist08

February 1, 2014 at 5:50 pm

8 Responses

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  1. […] Introduction Right now we have our nephew Ian living with us as he takes a Lighthouse Labs developer boot camp program in Ruby on Rails and Web Programming. This is a very intense course that has 8…  […]

  2. I observed this way of working visiting Sophos Labs downtown Vancouver last week. WhitePages is down town Seattle remodeled too (I really like the new office space)

    At my former ERP company Exact, we went through an osmosis from office to open space. Everything hard like changing to agile working, scrum, devops, hiring new blood, continuous integration, continuous beta (for those customers who want new functionality) seem to easier with this metamorphosis,

    boulton clive

    February 4, 2014 at 6:33 pm

    • Nice office at WhitePages, we definitely need a whiskey bar and kegerator.


      February 4, 2014 at 7:07 pm

  3. […] Introduction Right now we have our nephew Ian living with us as he takes a Lighthouse Labs developer boot camp program in Ruby on Rails and Web Programming. This is a very intense course that has 8…  […]

  4. […] an enthusiastic young man who is in a programmer’s boot camp (see Steve’s Blog entry The Times They Are a Changin) and as an educator this has brought to my mind new questions for my darling husband beyond, […]

  5. […] office design has improved over the years as well to better facilitate team work and collaboration. If you […]

  6. […] a few previous blog posts I’ve been talking about attracting new employees whether through office design, advice for someone starting their career or corporate mobility. In this article I’ll be looking […]

  7. […] blogged a bit about how work environments are changing here. How startups are often located downtown in shared spaces or incubators, whereas established […]

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