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Sage 300 ERP – Data Integrity

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Modern ERP systems maintain a company’s full financial history for many years. People want to be confident that all that data is correct and makes sense. So how can you be confident that your database has full referential integrity? Especially after years and years of operation. The Sage 300 ERP Data Integrity function is a way to validate the integrity of a database. Modern computers are much more reliable these days than when our Data Integrity function was originally written, but it still serves a good purpose. In this article we will explore some of the protections to protect data integrity in Sage 300 along with some of the possible causes of corruption.

Database Transactioning

The number one protection of data integrity in Sage 300 is database transactioning. Data is always written to the database in a database transaction. Database transactions always take the database from one state with full data integrity to the next state with data integrity. A database transaction is guaranteed by the database server to either be all written to the physical database or none of it is written, the database server guarantees that you will never see part of a transaction.

For instance as we post a G/L batch, we post each entry as a database transaction and since each entry in a G/L batch must be balanced we guarantee via database transactioning that the G/L is always in balance and hence data integrity is maintained.

Where Do Integrity Errors Come From?

Database transactioning sounds great, and in fact with database transactioning we see very few database problems in Sage 300 ERP. But when we do get integrity problems where do data integrity errors come from?

Below is a list of some of the main causes of data integrity problems. I’m sure there are more. I’m not looking to blame anyone (including myself), just to point out the main causes I’ve seen:

  • Bugs in the program. If Sage 300 asks SQL Server to store incorrect data, it will do so in a completely reliable transactional manner. Hopefully our QA processes catch most of these and this doesn’t happen often; but, Sage 300 is a large complicated program and mistakes happen.
  • People editing database tables directly in SQL Server Enterprise Manager. For various reasons people might try to put something in the database that the program doesn’t allow, and often this leads to database corruption.
  • Third party programs that write to the Sage 300 database directly. We do a lot of data validation checking in our business logic before allowing data to be written to the database, but if this is bypassed then corruption occurs. A common one in this case is not handling currency decimal places correctly.
  • Data validation needs to be tightened. Now and again, someone has written data that we accepted as valid that wasn’t. Then we had to tighten our data validation routines. The good news here is that we’ve been doing this for a long time now.
  • Bug in the Database Server. We’ve seen database indexes get corrupted which can lead to further problems either after the indexes are fixed (because of other data written as a result).
  • Partial backups or restores. We’ve seen people back up the tables for each application independently and then restore them. Perhaps to try to put A/R back to yesterday. But this corrupts the database since there is often matching data that needs to be in sync in Bank, Taxes or perhaps Order Entry. Make sure you always backup and restore the database as a whole.
  • Hardware glitches. Even with CRC checking and such, strange errors can start to appear from hard disk or memory hardware failures in computers.

The Data Integrity Checker

To find these sort of problems Sage 300 ERP has a data integrity checker in its Administrative Services. The main screen looks like:


You select the applications you want to check and whether you want to fix any minor errors. Since this can be a long process, for several applications you can also configure which parts within the application to check by selecting the application and choosing the application options in a screen like:


The end result is a report is run that lists all the errors found.

What Does the Integrity Checker Look For?

So what does the Integrity Checker do? Below is a list of some of the checks that are typically made:

  • Check the integrity of each file reading each record and calling the View Verify API which will call the business logic to validate the record. This includes things like checking the decimals of a money amount are correct, that the data is correct for the data type, that foreign keys are valid.
  • For Header/Detail type relationships there are often total or summary fields in the header like the total amount of an order or the number of detail lines. The integrity checker will read through the details and add up any of these numbers to ensure they match the header.
  • Check the database for any detail records that don’t have a matching header record (orphans).
  • Each application then knows about all sorts of cross file relationships that must be maintained and the Integrity Checker for that application will validate all of these relationships.

What Does Fix Minor Errors Do?

There is the check box to fix minor errors, but what does it do? Mostly it fixes up header/detail relationships by fixing any total or summary fields in header records. It can also delete orphan detail records. But generally it doesn’t attempt much because we don’t want to risk making things worse.

But it’s Slow

The big complaint about the Data Integrity checker is that it’s slow. This is because it does go through every record in the database as well as checking all the cross dependencies. These days we see company databases that are hundreds of gigabytes in size. Generally the complaint is that you can’t just run it as routine maintenance overnight. That you tend to have to configure what you want to run and do that selectively. It’s also best to run it when people aren’t in the system since it does put a fair bit of load on the system.

But this does open up an opportunity for third party developers. Companies like Tairox and Orchid offer solutions to automate data integrity or to run it as a service.


Even with super reliable modern databases and hardware, data integrity errors can still creep in and need to be dealt with. Just being aware they exist is half the battle. Also remember that it is extremely important to have regular full backups of your data in case of a really catastrophic failure.


4 Responses

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  1. […] Introduction Modern ERP systems maintain a company’s full financial history for many years. People want to be confident that all that data is correct and makes sense. So how can you be confident th…  […]

  2. Thanks for the link Steve! Good article. FYI, TaiRox has started work on a “Fast Data Integrity Checker” for large databases – designed to find some probable errors quickly, rather than all errors in a long time. Also extensible by providing XML descriptions of certain classes of errors.

    Don Thomson

    April 8, 2013 at 7:54 pm

  3. Internal error. Failed to get the number of decimals for the currency. Currency fields cannot be verified. (28 c:\dev\trunk\bk\base\source\views\curverify.c). Write down the message, leave Sage Accpac and Windows. Restart your computer and try the task again. See the Message Help section in the System Manager help for more information.

    loubens dufresne

    November 21, 2014 at 2:36 pm

    • Perhaps you deleted a currency code that is still in use? The error is because it could find a currency code in CSCCD that is used some where in Bank.


      November 21, 2014 at 5:37 pm

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