Stephen Smith's Blog

All things Sage ERP…

Devices and the Cloud

leave a comment »


Introduction

We are currently seeing a proliferation of devices being release from a new line of Tablets from Amazon, new tablets and phones from Samsung, the iPhone 5 from Apple and a certain amount of anticipation for all the Windows 8 based devices that should be coming next month.

Amazon is quickly becoming a major player in the tablet market; they have branched out from just delivering e-book readers to having a complete line of high performance tablets at very competitive prices. Amazon then makes most of its money selling books, music and movies to the owners of these tablets. These are Android based tablets that have been setup and configured with a fair bit of extra Amazon software to integrate seamlessly with the Amazon store.

In the Android world, Samsung continues to deliver exceptional phones and tables of all shapes and sizes.

Apple has just shipped the iPhone 5 and we would expect new iPads sometime early next year.

Meanwhile Microsoft has released to manufacturing Windows 8 and devices based on this should be appearing on or after October 26.

With each generation of these devices we are getting faster processors, more memory, higher resolution displays, better sound quality, graphics co-processors, faster communications speeds and a plethora of sensors.

With so many players and with the stakes so high (probably in the trillions of dollars), competition is incredibly intense. Companies are competing in good ways, producing incredible products at very low prices and driving an incredible pace of innovation. People are also competing in rather negative ways with very negative attacks, monopolistic practices, government lobbying and high levels of patent litigation. The good news is that the negative practices don’t seem to be blunting the extreme innovation we are seeing. We are getting used to being truly amazed with each new product announcement from all these vendors. Expectations are getting set very high at each product announcement and launch event. There is collateral damage with once powerful companies like RIM or Nokia making a misstep and being left in the dust. But overall the industry is growing at an incredible pace.

Amazing new applications are being developed and released at a frenetic pace for all these devices. They know where you are, what you are doing and offer advice, tips or provide other information. There are now thousands of ways to communicate and share information. They all have deep integrations with all the main social media services. They communicate with natural language and high levels of intelligence.

The Data Cloud

Many of these devices are extremely powerful computers in their own right. The levels of miniaturization we’ve achieved is truly astounding. These devices are all very different, but what they share is that they are all connected to the Internet.

We now access all our data and the Internet from many devices, depending on what we are doing. We many have a powerful server that we do processing on, we may have a powerful desktop computer with large screen monitors, we may have a laptop that we use at work or at home, we may have a tablet computer that we use when travelling or at the coffee shop, we all have smart phones that we rarely use to phone people with, we may have a smart TV, we may have a MP3 player and so on. The upshot is that we no longer use exclusively use one computing device. We now typically own and regularly use several computing devices; it seems most people have a work computer, a home computer, a tablet and at least one smart phone. People want to be able to do various work related tasks from any of these. So how do we do this? How do we work on a document at work, then later we get a thought and want to quickly update it from our phone? Most of these devices aren’t on our corporate LAN. Typically we are connecting to the Internet via Wifi or via a cell phone network. The answer is that we are no longer storing these documents on a single given computer. We are now storing these to a centralized secure cloud storage (like iCloud, GDrive, or DropBox). These clouds are a great way to access what we are working on from any network and any device. Then each device has an App that is optimized for that device to offer the best way possible to work on the document in the given context. Many of these services like Google Apps even let multiple people work on these documents at once completely seamlessly.

Further many of these devices can keep working on our documents when we are off-line. For instance working on something on an iPad while on an airplane. Then when the device is back on-line it can synchronize any local data with the master copy in the data cloud. So the master copy is in the cloud, but there are copies off on many devices that are going on-line and off-line. Then modern synchronization software keeps then all in sync and up to date. Google had an interesting add for its Chrome notebooks where they keep getting destroyed, but the person in the add just keeps getting handed a new one, logs in, and continues working from where he left off.

The Grid

What we are ending up with is a powerful grid of computing devices accessing and manipulating our data. We have powerful servers in data centers (located anywhere) doing complex analytics and business processes, we have powerful laptop and tablet computers that can do quite powerful data input, editing and manipulation. Then we have small connected devices like phones that are great for quick inquiries or for making smaller changes. Our complete system as a whole consists of dozens of powerful computing devices all acting on a central data cloud to run our businesses.

In olden days we had mainframe computing where people connected to a mainframe computer through dumb terminals and all processing was done by the mainframe computer that was guarded and maintained by the IS department. Then the PC came along and disrupted that model. We then had separate PCs doing their own thing independent from the central mainframe and independent from the IS department. Eventually this anarchy got corralled and brought under control with networks and things like domain policies. Then we took a turn back to the mainframe days with Web based SaaS applications. Rather than run on the corporate data center, these run in the software vendors datacenter and the dumb terminal is replaced by the Web Browser. This then re-centralized computing again. Now this model is being disrupted again with mobile devices. Where the computing power is back in the hands of the device owners who now controls what they are doing once again.

The difference now from the PC revolution is that everything is connected and out of this highly connected vast grid of very powerful computing devices we are going to see all new applications and all new ways of doing things. It’s interesting how quickly these disruptive waves are happening.

Summary

It’s really amazing what we are now taking for granted, things like voice recognition, you can just ask your phone a question and actually get back the correct answer. The ability to get a street view look at any location in the world. It’s an exciting time in the technology segment with no end in sight.

In this articles I was referring to documents, which most people would associate with spreadsheets or word processing documents. But everything talked about here can equally apply to all the documents in an ERP or CRM system such as Orders, Invoices, Receipts, Shipments, etc. We will start to see the same sort of distributed collaborative systems making it over to this space as well.

About these ads

Written by smist08

September 22, 2012 at 8:07 pm

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 260 other followers

%d bloggers like this: